Afforestation Clean Up Day

11 Jun

It is a fervent desire that the afforestation area is restored to its natural beauty to make an amazing nature viewing site.  The Richard St. Barbe Baker Afforestation Area as a dedication to St. B…

Source: Afforestation Clean Up Day

Using Diatomaceous Earth to deal with that nervous Tick: Preventing Lyme Disease

23 Nov

If you have pets you NEED to read this blog!  Source: Using Diatomaceous Earth to deal with that nervous Tick: Preventing Lyme Disease

Little known 1918 battle: Battle of Iwuy

25 Oct

Cimetiè re Iwuy carré militaire. Iwuy Military Cemetery
Niagra Cemetery, Iwuy Military Cemetery.

Little known 1918 battle: Battle of Iwuy

 

 

Français
English

 

A very worthwhile project has been initiated in the city of Iwuy (population 3,232), department Nord, district of Cambrai (region Nord-Pas-de-Calais), France. Michel Lespagnol, resident of the village hopes to pay tribute to all the people who participated in a little known 1918 battle that freed the village on the anniversary date of “The Battle of Iwuy.” Lespagnol, retired now from the Railways, has a love of history becoming an amateur local historian of the area, and is requested by the teachers to help explain the great sacrifices undertaken by military personnel. With supporting documents and field trips, the classroom of youngsters are enriched by the knowledge imparted to them about the war effort. Lespagnol feels deeply about the great time lapse between current generations and the era of the “war to end all wars” and worries that after the interest re-kindled by the 100th anniversary of armistice that the youngest will forget these hard times too quickly.

Now a brief introduction to the Battle of Iwuy. “Combining elements of all-arms fighting, the last Canadian cavalry charge, and the only engagement of Canadian troops with German tanks during the First World War. Mike McNorgan’s analysis [in the book, More Fighting for Canada: Five Battles 1760-1944] of the 1918 Battle of Iwuy is one of the most interesting and original of the essays in More Fighting for Canada by virtue of the fact that almost no one has ever heard of the action. “1

“The 21 st Canadian Battalion will cross the Canal de L’Escaut over bridge …[location] at
0800 hours this date, and occupy billets in ESCAUDOEUVRES.”Full text of “21st Infantry Battalion War Diary (1915-1919)” at Archive.org

October 9, 1918 the Canadian Light Horse (CLH) had crossed the Canal de l’Escaut to seize the high ground northwest of Naves. Their attack was halted with heavy losses, by concentrated machine gun fire coming from Naves and nearby Iwuy.”[5]

October 10, 1918 was a rainy, misty day. The “A” and “B” Companies and the 19th Battalion went ahead for the attack on the town of Naves establishing a position about 8:30 in the morning. “In the afternoon the cavalry came up to advance on the next ridge. They went over us about 2:00 or 3:00 in the afternoon. They had to go down a hill and up another. A creek [the River Erclin] ran between them and the Germans, who were on the other side in trenches on the hill. The cavalry went forward, the horses ringing wet (with sweat). …It is a pretty sight as they dashed down the hill and over the creek …then the Germans opened up on them. It was a shame. They could not help but hit them with machine guns. All the men out of seventy five or so went down but one, and he finally went. But the horses were not all killed. That attack was a failure…The charge on October 10 cost the regiment seventy-one animals, of which sixty-six were killed. The losses among the men were considerably lighter, five killed and seventeen wounded.”[5]

The 21 st Battalion War Diary mentions that on October 11th the Unit commanders met at 0100 hours to arrange the operation and details. The 20th Canadian Battalion was readied in the rear of the 21st Canadian Battalion, and they were ready to proceed at 0900 hours. The German troops shelled the area with H.E. and Gas from 05:30 hours onward. At 0900 hours, the 146th Brigade commenced to the the right of the 21st Canadian Battalion. Especially during the first hour of this advance on the high ground of Avesnes-Le-Sec many casualties were sustained as the Germans opened fire with machine guns. “Fifty percent of our Officers, N.C.O.s and Lewis Gunners became casualties during the first half hour of the action.” 21st Battalion

“The 4 th Canadian Infantry Brigade will continue the attack tomorrow, 11 th October, at
0900 hours, with the object of capturing AVESNES-le-SEC and move on to NOVELLES, and
attempt to make good crossing over River ERCLIN.
Full text of “21st Infantry Battalion War Diary (1915-1919)”

The action proceeded promptly at 0900 hours with the 146th Brigade on the right of the 21st Canadian Battalion. As the advance continued on the high ground south-west of Avesnes-Le-Sec and suffered many casualties from German machine gun fire. The enemy then brought out tanks as a counter measure. The Canadians withdrew to re-organize. 21 st Battalion war diary source

On October 11, 1918, the German counterattack involved military tanks. As the allies advanced, they were met by a bombardment of shells, and approaching tanks. After a reconnoiter by the military officers, the infantry was on task again. “Our officers began to figure it out and they yelled “come on Canadians.” We went and all the Imperials as well, we were all mixed up, and the rally was followed all along the line. It was in the open and there were thousands of men. The Germans were thick too. They had two tanks on our front. Great big square tanks. We went on to meet them and about halfways several of the tanks were shot by bullets. By now, the Germans had stopped and were starting to go back.”[5] In the aftermath, the reports differ as to the number of tanks, ranging from two to half a dozen tanks at this attack.

Deward Barnes states in his book, “Journal of Deward Barnes, Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1916-1919” that “this episode is also peculiar because it saw an officer of the British Empire employing a captured, German-made rifle to help drive off a German attack consisting mainly of captured, British-made tanks?” Barnes states that about one hundred abandoned and damaged British tanks had been re-furbished by the Germans as only about twenty German-made tanks had been deployed.

Now the 20th Canadian Battalion, was immediately after the 21st Canadian Battalion, and the 20th was the left attacking flank. After the withdrawal, the advance continued onwards at 1530 hours on October 11th. Now the 6th Canadian Infantry Brigade was fighting on the left. 21 st Battalion war diary source

As can be seen in the Military Cross Citation for Captain Baxter, “He [Baxter] pushed forward with his company, and having use of all his Lewis guns and three captured machine guns, was able to force the tanks to retire, thereby enabling the position to be held, and the advance to continue later.” source- Battling Tanks at Iwuy: The last German use of tanks in World War 1

“Thirteen Officers of those who went forward with the Battalion became casualties on October 10th – 11th.” Highest honours were bestowed. source 21 st Battalion war diary source

[October 11th/12th.] “Our casualties during the advance of the day were: Officers killed, 3; died of wounds, 1; wounded, 6; wounded at duty, 2; Gassed 1; Other Rankes, killed 39; wounded 272; Missing 2.” 21 st Battalion war diary source

Stephanie Potter in her thesis states, ” Cavalry was responsible for passing through the infantry line once objectives had been captured, and clearing the area of enemy troops while keeping pressure on the enemy retreat . In pursuit, speed was of the utmost importance to keep the enemy from reforming and reinforcing their lines and launching a counterattack. Cavalry was of vital importance in this particular role due to its superior mobility. Mounted troops were able to advance quickly, charge and disperse the enemy, and could efficiently round up small enemy parties or speed up their retreat.” However, as cavalry advanced into open country, enemy fire consistently came from covered locations such as woods, villages, and houses, leaving cavalry vulnerable and hard pressed to put enemy guns out of action. Thus machine gun support was necessary to counteract enemy fire, form defensive flanks and pivots for the cavalry to manoeuvre from and retain mobility, consolidate captured ground, and to fire upon the retreating enemy.”

Conversly, Potter states that tanks “were not designed to traverse trenches, but to advance across open country without being vulnerable to enemy fire.” Tanks had “limited reliability and slow rate of advance.” On observation tanks “were less vulnerable to machine gun fire than cavalrymen, but they could not sustain artillery fire…. Concentrated machine gun fire was capable of putting any tank out of action.” “Armoured vehicles also provided…a larger target, and lacked the cavalry’s mobility to escape …quickly….The enemy of the tank is the gun. In 1918 tanks were also hampered by limited manoeuvarability. It was understood that all tanks were incapable of manoeuvring in confined spaces, such as woods and villages. ….tanks could not perform their own reconnaissance due to poor visibility [from within the vehicle] and difficult communication between vehicles with no radios. ”

It is truly wonderful that Lespagnol is still in contact with the “family of George Hambley, one of the riders who wrote the last charge in his diary.” Additionally, Lespagnol states that “there is a small cemetery with 200 tombs of soldiers of the great war” at Niagara Cemetery, Nord, France.

Tank à Iwuy en 1918

Tank à Iwuy en 1918. A Tank at Iwuy in 1918.

According to Wikipedia, at Iwuy, there are two cemeteries which are managed by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. “The Communal Cemetery Iwuy (Iwuy Communal Cemetery) was enlarged by German troops during their occupation of the territory. This extension was granted by the municipality after the Armistice and the graves of German and French soldiers were moved to other cemeteries. The British cemetery was established by the 51st (Highland) Division in October 1918. The cemetery contains more than 100 graves of soldiers who died in 1914-1918 and 1939-1945
Niagara Cemetery was established in October 1918 during the occupation of the village by British troops. It contains more than 200 graves of victims of the First World War, with a few unidentified ”

Niagara Cemetery inside

Cimetière Niagara intérieur. Niagara Cemetery inside

Approximately 26 soldiers with ties to Saskatchewan are buried at the Niagara Cemetery. One of whom was Métis Canadian Soldier, Charles Daniels Service No. 718433, born March 18, 1896 to John and Maria Daniels. Lespagnol was interested in finding out “who were the parents of this soldier, just to know the 2 nationalities just to show to the youngest that this was the concern of all the nations to put a end to this dramatic war.” On the 1901 census his father, John Daniels (English) was born in Manitoba August 1855 and his mother Maria Daniels (Cree) was born 1871, in the North West Territories. They had seven children, Charles was the fourth child born in South Battleford, North West Territories. Charles enlisted twice, on February 5, 1916 he provided William Daniels of Frog Lake, Alberta, his brother, as the next of kin the next time he enlisted ~October 26, 1916 ~ he gave his sister Emma Martel of South Battleford as his next of kin. When Charles first enlisted he stated that he was a labourer at Onion Lake, and had previously served with the 22 Light Horse, Saskatchewan. He served six months over seas with the 107th over seas Battalion, C.E.F. in 1916 following his first WWI attestation. On his second enlistment papers, he was living in Saskatoon, and gave his occupation as farmer. He gave the supreme sacrifice October 11, 1918, while serving with the 28th Battalion.Charles had three younger siblings, Marianne Edward, and Dorothy. William was the eldest in the family then Emma and Natelline (Vatteline) nickname Lena.

It is very gratifying that Lespagnol is willing and enthusiastic to share his passionate study of history in respect to the Battle of Iwuy, this obscure World War I battle whose details are fascinating and slipping away from the lives of present day society. Lespagnol is able to take the individual soldier memorialized on the tombstones of the Niagara cemetery, and place them into their larger context, enabling the students to understand the era, the memories and sacrifices undertaken by the soldiers. The Battle of Iwuy which took place in October 1918, may seem remote, perhaps not as inaccessible as the Battle of Waterloo which also affected the villagers of Iwuy, however, Lespagnol brings the past into the present, helping the youngsters perceive history with a new perspective. Lespagnol’s experience and knowledge enable the groups of students come to grips with a wonderment of “how did things come to be this way?”

Iwuy Niagara cemetery commons

Cimetière Niagara. Niagara Cemetery Author Camster CC 3.0

 

In remembering those who gave their lives during the Great War students and educators are honouring the past during the World War One centennary. Lespagnol says that it is of note that “all the nations [came together] to put a end to this dramatic war” On the 16th and 19th of November, 2015, Michel Lespagnol will lead 2 groups of students to the Niagara cemetery to explain to them about the Battle of Iwuy” at the very place where it took place. Here they will receive a more comprehensive understanding of the impact World War I had globally. By exploring the histories of those memorialized at Niagara Cemetery, the outing will show the international impact of the war, and how it involved the greater majority of countries at that time. Lespagnol hopes the next generation will remember the great sacrifices made in the “war to end all wars”. The soldier’s stories will thusly be recalled to mind, and the lessons from the Battle of Iwuy are learned through the soldier’s voices. Lespagnol, hopes to make a link, a connection with the new generation, “a duty of memory not to forget the sacrifices of the allied who freed us from the invaders.” Students will experience history of those brave men, the terrible losses experienced by families and counties, and the global impact of World War One. Lespagnol’s “aim aim is to pay tribute to all the people who participated to free our village at the anniversary date of “The Battle of Iwuy.”

Author Julia Adamson.
If you have further information about the Battle of Iwuy, know of a source of information, the global involvement of soldiers or biography of those who served from Saskatchewan at the Battle of Iwuy, please e-mail Julia Adamson, Saskatchewan and Michel Lespagnol, Iwuy, France. Thank you.

THE DEAD

Blow out, you bugles, over the rich Dead!
There’s none of these so lonely and poor of old,
But, dying, has made us rarer gifts than gold.
These laid the world away;
poured out the red Sweet wine of youth;

gave up the years to be Of work and joy,
and that unhoped serene,

That men call age;

and those who would have been,
Their sons, they gave, their immortality.

Blow, bugles, blow!
They brought us,
for our dearth, Holiness, lacked so long, and Love, and Pain.

Honour has come back, as a king, to earth,
And paid his subjects with a royal wage;
And Nobleness walks in our ways again;
And we have come into our heritage.Rupert Brooke

 

Niagara cemetery

Niagara cimetière Niagara cemetery

H
o
u
s
eFamily
or
House-
holdName of each person in family or household on 31st March, 1901.Sex.Relationship
to head of
family or
household.Single,
married,
widowed or
divorced.Month and date of birth.Year of birth.Age at last birthday.Country or place of birth
(If in Canada specify Province or Territory, and add “r” or “u” for rural or urgan as the case may be)Racial or Tribal originReligionTradeMother Tongue (if Spoken)comments

1901 CENSUS for Charles Daniels Family



25 42 Daniels John M Head M Aug 1855 45 Man English Church of England Employed 12 months in other occupation than trade in factory or home. 400 Extra earnings (From other than chief occupation or trade) Mother tongue English is crossed out and Cree written in

26 42 Daniels Marie F Wife M 1871 30 NWT Cree Mother tongue if spoken is Cree

27 42 Daniels William M Son S Feb 18 1887 14 English Mother tongue if spoken is Cree Can read, write and speak English

28 42 Daniels Emma F Daughter S Sep 1889 11

29 42 Daniels Natelline F Daughter S Nov 20 1891 9

30 42 Daniels Charles M Son S Mar 19 1895 6 0* “

31 42 Daniels Marianne F Daughter S Mar 17 1898 3

    1901 Census of Canada Page Information

 


 

 

L
i
n
e
#No. of
family in
order of
visitationName of each person in family.Relation to head of family.Sex.Married,
single,
widowed or
divorced.Age.Country or Place of Birth

1906 CENSUS for Charles Daniels Family



15 3 Daniels John Head M M 60 Man

16 Daniels Mary Wife F M 36 Sask

17 Daniels William Son M S 19 Sask

18 Daniels Eunice ? Daughter F S 18 Sask

19 Daniels Lena Daughter F S 16 Sask

20 Daniels Charles Son M S 11 Sask

21 Daniels Mary Ann Daughter F S 9 Sask

22 Daniels Edward Son M S 3 Sask

23 Bull ? Solomon Boarder M S 19 Sask

1906 Census Page Data
District: SK Saskatchewan District (#16)
Subdistrict: 33 (Town of Battleford) Page 22

Images are from the National Archives Web Site
Details: Schedule 1 Microfilm T-18360
Source : Automated Genealogy


 

 

H
o
u
s
eFamily
or
House-
holdName of each person in family or household on 31st March, 1901.Sex.Relationship
to head of
family or
household.Single,
married,
widowed or
divorced.Month and date of birth.Year of birth.Age at last birthday.Country or place of birth
(If in Canada specify Province or Territory)

1911 CENSUS for Charles Daniels Family



36 19 Daniels John M Head M Apr 1850 60 Sask

37 19 Daniels Mary F Wife M Mar 1865 56 N.W.T

38 19 Daniels William M Son S Jan 1886 25 N.W.T

39 19 Daniels Charlie M Son S Mar 1894 17 N.W.T

40 19 Daniels Edward M Son S Apr 1902 9 N.W.T

41 19 Daniels Dorothy F Daughter S Mar 1911 03-Dec N.W.T

Note: Saskatchewan became a province in 1905, before this, the births were recorded in the area known as the North-West Territories (NWT). Territorial evolution of Canada Atlas of Saskatchewan Boundary Evolution

Source Automated Genealogy
/ 1911 / Saskatchewan / Battleford / 47 Battleford / page 3

National Archives


 

 

Lieut. Rich. Hocken is killed in action. Son of Former Mayor of Toronto - Lieut. G.E. Mills Reported in Wounded List. Toronto Star, Oct. 16, 1918

 

Lieut. Rich. Hocken is killed in action.
Son of Former Mayor of Toronto
– Lieut. G.E. Mills Reported in Wounded List.
Toronto Star, Oct. 16, 1918

 

PHOTO RICHARD HOCKEN

Richard Hocken

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

20th Battalion Central Ontario, CEF. Wikipedia

Canadian Expeditionary Force: Central Ontario Regiment FirstWorldWar.com A multimedia hsitory of world war one. 20th Battalion.

21st Battalion (Eastern Ontario), CEF Wikipedia.

21st Battalion, Nominal Rolls 1915 and 1918 Canadian Expeditionary Force. Minister of Militia and Defence.
Year 1915.

21st Battalion History PWOR. The Princess of Wales Own Regiment.

The 21st Battalion CEF

21st Battalion CEF Discussion Group Yahoo Groups.

21st Battalion (Eastern Ontario) CEF Canadian Expeditionary Force Biographies written by Al Lloyd

Elie Barry **
Alfred Stanley Brown ***
Russell Brown
Roy A Burns
William E. Campbell
James Thomas Carroll
Gidreau (aka Gideon) Chartrand *
Richard A Clarke
George Granville Cobbledick
Thomas Sylvester Connaghan
Matthew Craig
Russell Crarey
Alexander DeMarsh
Roy Dickinson
Hugh Whitmore Dodson
William Harold Edmiston
William Forbes Ferrier
Pte James Foley
Sebra Hall
Pte William Hartell
Frederick William Heath *
Pte Findlay Henderson
Pte William Henderson
Pte James S Heyworth
Pte Mortie Hodge
Pte Harry Hopkinson
Pte Michael Kaley
Pte Montague EM Kemp
Pte Thomas Kenny
L/Sgt Alexander T King
Pte Irwin P Lehman
Ferdinand Leon
Pte Joseph Levert
John Robert Crawford MacPherson
James Mansfield
John Roy McBride
Charles Howard McInnis
David A McKenzie
Ian Ross McKenzie
Pte William J Newnham
James Leo O’Connor
Henry John Parkins
Pte Patrick Philban
Francis William Porter
Pte George A Ryan
Lt Alexander M Scott
Pte Francis Silver
Pte Herbert L Simpson
Pte John A Storey
Pte Joseph W Switzer
Pte Frederick H Tryon
Sgt John Turriff
Thomas Russell Watson
Pte Wellesley Wesley-Long
Pte Edwin Whitefoot
Pte J Wilson
Pte Norman Wilson
Pte Hilliard Wood
* Two buried at Ramillies British Cemetery
** Buried at Bucquoy Road Cemetery
Ficheux France
*** Buried at Marcoing Line, British Cemetery at Sailly, France.
Cemetery was later named the Cantimpre Canadian Cemetery

~ Those without stars, died October 11, 1918 and are buried at
Niagara Cemetery, Nord, France.

Within the biographies are excerpts from the 21st Battalion war diary regarding the Battle of Iwuy.

October 9, 1918.

“The 21 st Canadian Battalion will cross the Canal de L’Escaut over bridge …[location] at
0800 hours this date, and occupy billets in ESCAUDOEUVRES.”Full text of “21st Infantry Battalion War Diary (1915-1919)” at Archive.org

The 21 st Battalion War Diary mentions that on October 11th the Unit commanders met at 0100 hours to arrange the operation and details. The 20th Canadian Battalion was readied in the rear of the 21st Canadian Battalion, and they were ready to proceed at 0900 hours. The German troops shelled the area with H.E. and Gas from 05:30 hours onward. At 0900 hours, the 146th Bridage commenced to the the right of the 21st Canadian Battalion. Especially during the first hour of this advance on the high ground of Avesnes-Le-Sec many casualties were sustained as the Germans opened fire with machine guns. “Fifty percent of our Officers, N.C.O.s and Lewis Gunners became casualties during the first half hour of the action.” 21st Battalion

“The 4 th Canadian Infantry Brigade will continue the attack tomorrow, 11 th October, at
0900 hours, with the object of capturing AVESNES-le-SEC and move on to NOVELLES, and
attempt to make good crossing over River ERCLIN.
Full text of “21st Infantry Battalion War Diary (1915-1919)”

The action proceeded promptly at 0900 hours with the 146th Brigade on the right of the 21st Canadian Battalion. As the advance continued on the high ground south-west of Avesnes-Le-Sec and suffered many casualties from German machine gun fire. The enemy then brought out tanks as a counter measure. The Canadians withdrew to re-organize. 21 st Battalion war diary source

Now the 20th Canadian Battalion, was immediately after the 21st Canadian Battalion, and the 20th was the left attacking flank. After the withdrawal, the advance continued onwards at 1530 hours on October 11th. Now the 6th Canadian Infantry Brigade was fighting on the left. 21 st Battalion war diary source

As can be seen in the Military Cross Citation for Captain Baxter, “He [Baxter] pushed forward with his company, and having use of all his Lewis guns and three captured machine guns, was able to force the tanks to retire, thereby enabling the position to be held, and the advance to continue later.” source- Battling Tanks at Iwuy: The last German use of tanks in World War 1

“Thirteen Officers of those who went forward with the Battalion became casualties on October 10th – 11th.” Highest honours were bestowed. source 21 st Battalion war diary source

[October 11th/12th.] “Our casualties during the advance of the day were: Officers killed, 3; died of wounds, 1; wounded, 6; wounded at duty, 2; Gassed 1; Other Rankes, killed 39; wounded 272; Missing 2.” 21 st Battalion war diary source



The 51st (Highland) Division The 51st Division War Sketches by Fred. A. Farrell.

ANDERSON, Carl Werner{Saskatoon, SK) Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial. SVWM.

Anderson, Carl Werner January 1, 1890 – October 11, 1918. Enlistment Nov. 6, 1916, Saskatoon, SK Canadian Virtual War Memorial. Government of Canada. Veterans Affairs.

Barnes, Deward and Bruce Cane. Chapter 11. The Armistice, October 9, 1918 to February 10, 1919 It made you think of home: The Haunting Journal of Deward Barnes, Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1916-1919
Edition illustrated, annotated
Publisher Dundurn, 2004
ISBN 1550025120, 9781550025125

Digitized online by Google Books. Pages 256-265.

Barry, Bill. Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial World War I, Use advanced search for Niagara Cemetery, Iwuy France.

Saskatchewan Personnel
Cimetiè re Iwuy carré militaire
Niagara Cemetery, Iwuy, Nord, France

Given Names Surname Country of Background Citations
Carl Werner Anderson Born Boslau, Sweden, Enlistment Saskatoon, SK, Died Naves, France. British War Medal, Victory Medal
William James Beetham Birth Northallerton, North Yorkshire, England, Residence Paddockwood, SK, Employed and enlistment at Winnipeg, MB, Died Thun-Saint-Martin.
John Henry Belt Born Darlington, Durham, England, Residence “Little Red River Reserve”, Ailingly, SK, Enlistment, Prince Albert, SK, Died Thun-Saint-Martin. Military Medal
William Jasper Benson * Born Bellingham, Lac qui Parle Co, Minnesota, Farmer at Cabri, SK, Parents reside Watrous, SK, Died Thun-Saint-Martin
James Cameron Born Mont Nebo, NWT, Enlistment Prince Albert, SK, Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
Charles Daniels Born Battleford, NWT, Enlisted Winnipeg, MB, Residence Meadow Lake, SK, and Onion Lake, SK. Re-enlisted Saskatoon, SK Died Thun-Saint-Martin
Turnbull Davidson Born Belsay, Northumberland, England. Residence Rabbit Lake, SK then Square Hill, SK. Enlistment Battleford, SK. Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
George Humphrey Dayman Born Whitewood, NWT, Residence Windthorst, SK, Enlistment Regina, SK,
Joseph Degrasse Born Bathurst, Gloucester Co., New Brunswick, Residence Big River, SK, Enlistment Regina, SK, Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
George Derby Born province of Ontario, Parents from Quebec, Residence Ernfold, SK, Enlistment Regina, SK, Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
Peter L Drake Born Dunnville, Haldminad Co, Ontario, Residence Buchanan, SK and Birch Hills, SK, Enlistment Prince Albert, SK, Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
Herman Dycke Born Winkler, Mb, Residence Warman, SK, Enlistment Saskatoon, SK, Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
Edwin Goff Born Clarenceville, MRC de Haut-Richelieu, Quebec, Residence Rouleau, SK, Enlistment Regina, SK, Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
Edwin Hartsook Born Sioux Falls, Minnehaha Co. South Dakota, ResidenceT Sceptre, SK, Enlistment Regina, Sk, Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
Alfred Hermanson Born Sweden. Residence Sturgis, Sk. Enlistment Melville, SK. Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
Isaiah Hopson Born Lower Gornal, West Midlands, England. Residence Estevan, SK. Enlistment Estevan, Sk. Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
Levi Hyde Born Somerset, England, Labourer at Springside, SK (resident), enlistment at Yorkton, SK, Died Thun-Saint-Martin.
Montague Ewart Miller Kemp Born Rotherfield, East Sussex, England. Residence Prince Albert, SK. Enlistment Prince Albert, SK. Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
John Wasdale Lowes Born Bosworth, Wellington Co., Ontario. Residence Saskatoon, SK. Enlistment Prince Albert, SK. Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
Isaac Morris Born Montgomery, Powys, Wales. Residence Wideview, SK. Enlistment Regina, SK. Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
James Leo O’Connor Born Lonsdale, Hastings Co. Ontario. Residence Gull Lake, SK. Enlistment Kingston, Frontenac Co., Ontario.
Francis Silver Born Barnstable, Barnstable Co, Massachusetts. Residence Tregarva, SK. Enlistment Regina, SK. Death northeast of Cambrai.
John Kearse Wakeling Born Greater London, England. Parents Maple Creek, SK. Residence Fox Valley, Sk. Enlistment Maple Creek, SK. Death Iwuy.
Wellesley Tylney Wesley-Long Born Munising, Alger Co., Michigan. Residence Saskatoon, SK. Parents of Munich, Bavaria, Germany. Enlistment Saskatoon, SK. Death northeast of Cambrai.
Prince George Wheater Parents Flockton Manor House, Wakefield, England. Served with Saskatchewan Regiment, Canadian Infantry.
Raynor Wright Born Peterborough, England, Residence Marieton, SK. Enlistment Regina, SK. Died Iwuy. Military Medal
* William Jasper Benson buried at Iwuy communal cemetery
Note: Those soldiers born in the NWT were born in the North-West Territories of Canada. It was not until 1905 that the province of Saskatchewan was formed, and Mont Nebo, Battleford, and Whitewood were all placenames of Saskatchewan after this date.

Battle of Cambrai (1917) wikipedia

Battling Tanks at Iwuy the Last German use of Tanks in World War i Word Press. Link recommended by Al Lloyd historian for the 21 st Canadian Battalion


BENSON, William Jasper; {Cabri, SK) Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial. SVWM.

BEETHAM, William James; {Paddockwood, SK) Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial. SVWM.

BENSON, William Jasper, September 1, 1895-October 11, 1918, Watrous, Saskatchewan. Canadian Virtual War Memorial. Government of Canada. Veterans Affairs.

Between Long Lake and Last Mountain : Bulyea, Duval, Strasbourg.
Publisher, Date:
Strasbourg, Sask. : Strasbourg, Bulyea, Duval History Book Committee, 1982.
ISBN:
0889252327 (This book mentions Raynor Wright in the Roll of Honour listing.)

Borch, Peter. 28th Northwest Canadian Infantry Battalion. Saskatchewan Encyclopedia. Canadian Plains Research Center. University of Regina. 2006.

Cameron, James image Pages of the Past : History of Shell Lake-Mont Nebo districts

Published by Shell Lake: Shell Lake History (1986) (1986)

ISBN: 0 889 25487 7 , 9780 889 25487 9

Canadian Expeditionary Force Study Group. “The Matrix Project” 21st Battalion.

Canadian Great War Project

Canadian Virtual War Memorial Charles Daniels Veterans Affaires Remembrance Memorials Veterans Affairs Canada

Date modified:
2015-08-12

Cavalry in Training. National Film Board. “The Canadian Light Horse (CLH), distinct from the CCB, was formed in early 1917 from the 19th Alberta Dragoons, the 1st Hussars and the 16th Light Horse. The unit reported to Canadian Corps Headquarters and first saw action at Vimy Ridge in April 1917. The CLH played a key role at Iwuy on October 10, 1918, where the last ever swords-drawn Canadian cavalry charge took place. In the final month of the war, the CLH were in front as a scouting force that ensured protection against attacks by German layback controls. ”

[1] Chief Military Personnel CMP Home > Canadian Military Journal CMJ Home > More Fighting for Canada: Five Battles 1760-1944. Book Reviewed by Major James D. McKillip. Government of Canada. Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces. Book recommended by Michel Lespagnol, Iwuy, France Historian

Conclusion of the Battle of Iwuy. Forgotten Books.ca. Canadas Hundred Days with the CAnadian Corps from Amiens to Mons. p. 310

DANIELS, Charles, (Battleford, Onion Lake, Saskatoon, Meadow Lake, Sk)Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial (SVWM)

DANIELS, Charles Canadian War Graves Commission CWGC

From Warriors to Soldiers. List of Native Veterans. Iwuy.

Frost, Cecil Gray (1897-1947) 6th Brigade Canadian Machine Gun Company. Cecil Gray Frots (1897-1947). WWI Correspondence 1917-1919. Letter 18 16 October 1918 – France – an extremely slight wound … saw the fall of Cambrai

[5] Greenhouse, Brereton, James McWilliams, R. James Steel, Kevin R. Shackleton, George H. Cassar, and Bruce Cane. The Torch We Throw: The Dundurn WWI Historical Library: Amiens/Second to None/The Making of Billy Bishop/Hell in Flanders Fields/It Made you Think of Home The Torch We Throw: The Dundurn WWI Historical Library Illustrated Edition. Dundurn, 2014. ISBN 1459730305, 9781459730304 link recommended by Michel Lespagnol, Iwuy, France Historian


Horses in World War I Wikipedia.

HYDE, Levi {Springside, SK) Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial. SVWM.

Infantry Regiments. The South Saskatchewan Regiment. Volume 3, Part 2. National Defence and the Canadian Forces. Government of Canada. 2010-11-25

Kemp, Montague Ewart Miller. May 25, 1898- October11, 1918. Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. Canadian Virtual War Memorial. Government of Canada. Veterans Affairs.

In Memory by Pierre Vanderfelden The visit of Commonwealth graves in Communals Cemeteries & Churchyards in Belgium & France

KEMP, Montague Ewart Miller. (Prince Albert, Sk) Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial (SVWM)

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) Military Heritage. Canada and the First World War.
Date Created: 2000-11-11
Date Modified: 2008-11-07

Lindsay, Robert 28th North-West Battalion Headquarters. 2006

McPherson, Arlean.

The Battlefords : a history.

Publisher, Date:
Saskatoon : Modern Press, [c1967]
Commissioned by the Town Council of Battleford and the City Council of North Battleford to commemorate the anniversary of 100 years of Confederation. (This book mentions that J. Daniels served with No. J. Company, North West Rebellion of 1885 according to a quote from the April 23, 1885 edition of the Saskatchewan Herald newspaper)

Minutes the Western Front Association.

Niagra Cemetery Iwuy, Nord, France. Private 886397 Peter L. Drake

28th Bn. Canadian Infantry (Saskatchewan Regiment)

10/10/1918

Son of Peter Montrose and Elizabeth Ann Cowell Drake of Dunn Township, Haldimand County, Ontario, Canada.

Row. E. 8.

Enlisted 18/02/1916

[2]Nicholson, G.W.L. (1964). Official History of the Canadian Army in the First World War: Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1914-1919 (pdf) (2nd ed.). Ottawa: Duhamel, Queen’s Printer and Controller of Stationery. p. 458. Retrieved 26 April 2011.

[3] Nicholson, G. W. L. 1962. Official History of the Canadian Army in the First World War: Canadian Expeditionary Force 1914-1919. Queens Printer and Controller of Stationary, Ottawa, Canada. Chapter XV Canadian Expeditionary Force (doc) The Final Advance. 12 October – 11 November. The Enemy Faces Defeat. Nicholson Matrix


 

Old Strathcona Remembers (OSR). (Edmonton, Alberta). Light Horse Park Application

  • Approval of Ligh Horse Park Naming, Strathcona Light Horse History, Map of Park Location in Strathcona Neighbourhood, Edmonton, Alberta. (pdf)
  • Naming Committee (pdf)
  • At the present, the Old Strathcona Remembers (OSR) committee has been successful in having an unnamed park at Strathcona, 84-85 Ave and Gateway Blvd – 104 St named the Light House Park. The history of the park area is closely related to World War I overseas theatre of battle as “In 1914, Edmonton’s cavalry soldiers and horses departed for service from the Strathcona train station in what is now Old Strathcona” – quote from the committee pdf. “A Squadron, Canadian Light Horse, made the last cavalry charge in Canadian history at the battle of Iwuy on 10 October 1918. This means that among the predecessor units of the The South Alberta Light Horse, or SALH… mounted the last cavalry charge in Canadian history.”[Wikipedia]

    Upon contacting the Old Strathcona Remmbers (OSR) Committee, Stephen “Sticks” Gallard, Chair OSR replied that “4 years ago we (OSR) started having Nov 11th parades in the unnamed park just west of the Connaught Armouries built in 1914 for the 19th Alberta Dragoons now folded into the SALH. OSR was started to address moving an original Legion Memorial located in the south end of the park to the north end ..to create a better space for the growing number of participants both military and civilian to attend. This idea took off and we then decided to build a better monument with an interactive park around it to showcase the relationship of the park, Connaught Armouries and the old rail-head across Gateway Blvd where the troops in WW1 would have embarked heading east to be shipped over to the battle fields of Europe during WW1.”

    Remebrance Day 2014 – Holy Trinity Church (near Light Horse Park

    “There is currently a small monument put in by the Legion in 1967 which will be
    relocated and enhanced using it as the middle piece of the new monument. Once done we
    hope to have the Feds certify it as an official Cdn war memorial.”

    “During all of this I realized the park had never been named and submitted for consideration and
    the subsequent approval Sept 2014 of the name of Light Horse Park. The logic behind this name
    was to reflect on the SALH a cavalry Regiment, the other units folded into it such as 19th AB Dragoons
    and also as homage to the horsemanship skills Albertan’s have always shown which lead to many of them
    being assigned to the Remounts Depot in Southhampton UK in WW1.”

    “Thus we now are working on raising funds to complete this project and hope to have it done by the
    spring of 2018 to coincide with the centenary of the end of WW1.” Proposed Perspective for Park (pdf) Proposal for park in 2018 (jpg picture)

    “We are seeking corporate and private sponsors and will also be doing a sponsor a brick to have
    a loved one lost in conflict inscribed on it to forever be a part of the parks rich history.” : Old Strathcona Remembers: Op Legacy Enhance (Word document) Stakeholders and Supporters

    “Our organization is requesting funds to help us in our goal to relocate and enhance by way of developing an interpretive park around it a monument that we can seek Federal recognition of as a certified Canadian war monument. This would be the only such monument in Old Strathcona and with reading boards around the monument would link the histories of the Connaught Armouries, the Railhead of the early 1900s across from it and the park now known as Light Horse Park and Holy Trinity Anglican the units Regimental Church. This project would also recognize those who gave the ultimate sacrifice, the units that were involved as are now represented by The South Alberta Light Horse the provinces oldest regiment and the rich history of Old Strathcona. The park where it will be located 8513 104St is where troops and their horses were marshaled and processed through the armories to embark for the battlefields of Europe from the railhead across the street now known as Gateway Blvd. Completion date is designed to coincide with the centenary of the end of WW1 at which time we envision it being full readied for public use. We meet the Edmonton salutes mandate as this entire project is related to those who served and their legacies. Further it will allow people for generations to understand and recognize what the area of Old Strathcona went through sending its loved ones off to war.”… This quotation is an introduction from the Old Strathcona Remembers: Op Legacy Enhance (Word document)

    Linda Duncan NDP MP for Edmonton Strathcona (Alberta) tweeted: “Here’s hoping we have Light Horse Park cenotaph in place to celebrate Canada’s 150th” (which happens to be 2017).

    There have been newsprint interviews, a podcast on CTV news, and a piece on CBC radio one.

    “We received a donation of 300 bricks from the U of A when they tore down 100 yr old homes for the
    new Loughheed Centre for LEadership, another 300 or so from a gent who had bricks from a torn
    down 1893 home and we will be getting more from the Leamington Mansion which was also a 100 years
    old which burnt down just over a 1 week ago.” Above notes are from an email from Stephen “Sticks” Gallard, Chair OSR supported by some current events news articles.

  • Kent, Gordon, Group using old bricks for new memorial honouring Edmonton’s First World War history. Edmonton Journal. October 25, 2015
  • Leamington Mansion bricks to live on as part of war memorial Metro News Edmonton.

[4] Patterson, Tim. New Brunswick Land Company and the Settlement of Stanley and Harvey. Harvey Cenotaph Index Page

In memory of
Lance Corporal
NORMAN JAMES ROBISON

Potter, Stephanie E. “Smile and Carry On” Canadian Cavalry on the Western Front, 1914-1918. (2013) The University of Western Ontario. Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository. Paper 1226. [speaks to the use of tanks and the Cavalry in WWI. The cavalry actions of October 9 and 10 are discussed on Page 324-330 of the paper (the Adobe Acrobat Reader pdf pages are 335-341.]

Private Levi Hyde. “Born 17 Mar 1888 Walton, Somerset, England. Emigrated to Canada 17 Apr 1912. Married Elsie Parratt 1913 in Springside, Saskatchewan. Father of Arthur and Doris. Enlisted 28th Battalion 15 Oct 1915. Killed on last day of the Battle of Iwuy, aged 30.” Burial:
Niagara Cemetery
Iwuy
Departement du Nord
Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
Plot: E. 26.

Royal Regina Rifles Wikipedia

South Alberta Light Horse

Springside and district memoirs.
Publisher, Date:
[Springside, Sask. : Springside Historical Society, 1983] (This book mentions Private Levi Hyde in the roll of Honour listing)

Tempest, Capt. E.V. Title History of the Sixth Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment: Volume I.—1/6th Battalion, Volume 1

Edition reprint
Publisher Andrews UK Limited, 2012
ISBN 1781515271, 9781781515273 Digitized online by Google Books

Wakeling, John Kearse- age 32 – October 11, 1918 Maple Creek, Saskatchewan Canadian Virtual War Memorial. Government of Canada. Veterans Affairs.

War Diary of the 18th Battalion CEF Battling Tanks at Iwuy The last German use of tanks in World War One.

Wartime letters of Leslie and Cecil Frost 1915-1919 R. B. Fleming. Wilfrid Laurier University Press. 007

Wells, Jennifer. Last Commonwealth Soldier killed in WWI. George Price from Moose Jaw, Sask, was shot in the back, possibly while trying to steal a kiss from a Belgian Woman Toronto Star. Nov 09 2014

Wheater, Prince George. May 26, 1894- October11, 1918. Canadian Infantry Saskatchewan Regiment. Canadian Virtual War Memorial. Government of Canada. Veterans Affairs.

Wright, Raynor. June 4, 1886-October 11, 1918. Marieton, Saskatchewan. Canadian Virtual War Memorial. Government of Canada. Veterans Affairs.

WRIGHT, Raynor, (Bulyea, Sk) Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial (SVWM)

Canadian Mounted Rifles_poster

Rifles poster Canadian Mounted.
Canadian Mounted Rifles poster

Bibliography:
To: saskgenweb@yahoo.com
From: Michel Lespagnol
Subject: Soldier

If you have further information about the Battle of Iwuy, know of a source of information, the global involvement of soldiers or biography of those who served from Saskatchewan at the Battle of Iwuy, please e-mail Julia Adamson, Saskatchewan and Michel Lespagnol, Iwuy, France Thank you.

Saskatchewan’s Health Care Evolution Towards Medicare – Part 1

6 Aug

 

Saskatchewan’s Health Care Evolution Towards Medicare

Part I

Medical Logo with Hands

Medical Logo with hands

 

Much has been written about Medicare, its birth in Saskatchewan, and the key players involved in its evolution. The following is a brief backgrounder, a reference to identify the evolution of health care in Saskatchewan. By examining the origins of medicare, and the actions of some of the more prominent people involved it is hoped that readers will remember the growth and evolution of medicare and what forces came into play during the history of health care. We invite readers to Phone or email Marilyn Decker , – – granddaughter of Matthew (Matthias) Anderson if you have observations, comments or suggestions you could share. It would be much appreicated if you could fill out a short Survey answering questions like: What are your memories of the doctor’s strike in 1962? Were you working in the medical field at the time? What are your memories of life before medicare?

Pioneer Saddle Bag Doctor


” Medical care was practically non-existant in the very early times. Doctors and medicines were scarce and there weren’t any hospitals. Home remedies were used and although perhaps good to a certain extent, there were many untimely deaths, especially from communicable diseases such as diptheria, small pox, typhoid and scarlet fever and consumption (T.B.)”Grummett p 17 “Resourcefulness in cases of emergency was fostered in the home of the pioneer on the western plains and home remedies had to be relied upon. Some of the favoured remedies were said to be, by those who spoke from experience, none too pleasant to the palate, but they had great healing power.”Storer p. 104

“Doctor’s those days had to be entirely dedicated to survive – that is, on the prairies. Often saw him in the dead of winter, in his voluminous coon coat, bundled into his cutter, out to serve humanity in the bleak outlands; rain, shine or blizzard.” Greenblat p.19The prairie weather set obstacles for both rural resident and pioneering prairie doctors. “The roads were few and poorly maintained. When it rained, the mud was deep and sticky, often clogging the wheels of the buggy…The winter was the most trying time, especially when blizzards would blow up and continue for a day or two or more. The road would blow over with snow and only here and there could one see the track that had been made. When telephones came in, one would try to see from one pole to the other. If snow got deep on the road, it would be difficult to pass a cutter or sleigh coming from the opposite direction lest you slid off the road and find it very hard to get it back on. During those early days and for many years later, outbreaks of typhoid were very common. …It was hard to get about in the winter and as telephonic communication was bad or nil, when one got a call to see a serious case, it would be arranged when the next visit was to be made.”MacLean p.63

Much is said about the pioneer doctor travels: “Her practice required frequent traveling. For difficult trails or a distance that meant camping and the tending of horses, she always had a driver. On the Reserve, or to settler’ homes within a range of ten to twelve miles, she drove Malin; and the doctor and her beautiful pacing mare became known through the country.”Buck p. xvi

The British North America Act of 1867, Sec. 92 set out that the local public health activities should be established and maintained by institutions set up by Provincial Governments. Provisions were set out for medical inspection of school children by medical health officers or public health nurses.StatsCan 1939 p. 1027

Typhus fever, diptheria, typhoid, scarlet fever, the Spanish Flue influenza epidemic of 1916, venereal disease (vd), tuberculosis -(consumption)-, polio, accompanied the accidents, gangrene, blizzards, frostbite, broken bones, infections, food poisoning trials and tribulations of the early settlers. To quell the outbreak of contagious disease, Maurice MacDonald Seymour implemented a highly publicized public health campaign, “The Seymour Plan” encouraging cleanliness, and sanitation. Seymour organized the Saskatchewan Medical Association (SMA) in 1905. Between 1885 and 1905, he served with the North-West Territories Medical Council, as either both president and vice-president.

According to Dr. Hugh McLean who practised medicine 1906-1912 a doctor could expect one dollars for an office call, two dollars for a house visit, and fifteen dollars for a confinement case. Additionally a dollar a mile may be added to the bill. In another report, before Medicare, “doctors make house calls and charge $4 to $7 for one. An office visit costs $5 or less. An appendectomy is $125. Removal of a tumour by a neurosurgeon is $350. Complete obstetric service- pre-natal, delivery and post-natal care – $80 for a general practitioner, $100 for a specialist.”Cannel July 14, 1962

“In 1909, The Public Health Act created a Bureau of Public Health responsible to the Minister of Municipal Affairs. The Bureau played a largely supervisory role and was replaced by a more powerful Department of Public Health in 1923.”Mombourquette. P. 101

 

Hospitals

A typhoid epidemic struck Medicine Hat in 1888. The Canadian Pacific Railway rallied around its divisional point. A Territorial bill was passed, and fund raising began for a hospital to support the town, the railway workers away from home. By 1890 a facility was raised. By 1910, the voluntary general hospital development days were over, municipalities worked in concert with the provincial government to establish hospitals.Feather

“When the province joined confederation in 1905, there were already voluntary organisations playing a service delivery function. For example, the Victorian Order of Nurses was providing homecare and running hospitals, the Salvation Army was aiding immigrants to settle in the prairies, and find jobs, the Canadian Red Cross was running hospitals, the Women’s Christian Temperance Union was providing services to needy people, Yorkton Queen Victoria Hospital was providing inpatient services and the Regina Council of Women was instrumental in establishing other voluntary organizations to provide human services (e.g. Regina Children’s Aid Society, Regina YWCA).”DeSantis p. 11 Dr. M. Seymour, as Commissioner of Public Health, he is appointed the first Medical Health Officer (MHO) for Saskatchewan.

Hospitals began in homes, with local nurses or doctors presiding over health care for early communities. On the arrival of the North West Mounted Police, sick bays and police surgeons began to be established at their posts. Alongside early fur trading posts and NWMP posts came missions run by protestant missionaries, Sisters of Charity (Grey Nuns), and Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate in Canada. Missionaries would set about establishing schools, dispensaries and hospitals. The Red Cross and Victoria Order of Nurses (VON) were involved with establishing the first hospitals. The 1885 North West Rebellion set up temporary military hospitals at local hospitals or town homes. The Union Hospital Organization was set into place facilitating the construction, and maintenance of hospitals by two or more municipalities. Further, these municipalities which formed the hospital district could enter into an agreement to provide free hospital treatment for certain classes of patients at the cost of the RM.sup>StasCan 1939 p. 1034

From the late 1800s to about 1950, women in labour could turn to a midwife, a maternity home matron or a doctor for help in delivering a new arrival. Due to vast distances and poor roads and transport by horse and cart or ox and buggy, there was a strong demand for mid wives. Births may be attended to in the home, at a maternity home in the nearby town or village or in a hospital if a city was close by. The fees for the rural doctors (if one was available) were high. Maternity homes sprang up around the province, increasing in number until 1944. “The Mutual Medical and Hospital Benefit Act of 1944 precipitated a hospital building spree.”Fung p. 63

 

Municipal Doctor System

 

“It was in 1914 that the residents of the village of Holdfast and the surrounding Rural Municipality of Sarnia No. 221 learned that their doctor intended to seek a more financially rewarding locality in which to practice. The news caused such widespread dismay that the municipal council took prompt and drastic but effective steps. A sum of $1500 from property tax revenue was offered as a retainer and Dr. H. J. Schmitt was persuaded to remain in Holdfast.”Reid p.7

Manitoba spearheaded the program of “Mother’s Allowances” in 1916 to provide assistance to mothers widowed or without any other means of support.CYB 1931 p. 1018 This program spread to other provinces.

The Rural Municipality Act of 1916 was amended to allow municipal doctor arrangements. The Health Services Board was established in the province to oversee these fee for service contracts. Gordon S. Lawson writes of the municipal doctor system which saw the introduction of Medical Services Incorporated MSI schemes in 1955. MSI allowed the patient to choose physicians anywhere in the province, and with better highway and vehicular transportation, rural residents wished access to specialist services available in the urban cities and towns which was not provided for under the municipal doctor plans.

 

Health Insurance Districts

in 1902, Anderson arrived and set up homesteading near Bulyea. In 1919, he returned to Norway, and “had the opportunity to gather information in regard to social services, particularly health services. I began to wonder why we couldn’t adopt a similar plan in Canada with adjustments suitable to our conditions.”Anderson p. 43

The Public Health Act was amended in March 1923 wherein the Bureau of Public Health was made a Department of Public Health under a Minister and Deputy Minister appointed by the government. This Department administered the Public Health Act, Vital Statistics Act, Union Hospital Act, an Act to Regulate Public Aid to Hospitals, Venereal Disease Act and the Tuberculosis Sanatoria and Hospitals Act.StatsCan 1927-1928 p. 963-964

As of 1926, Statistics Canada reported that there were 58 general, maternity, and isolation hospitals in the province, two sanitoria for consumptives, 2 hospitals for the insane and 1 home for orphan and refuges. The total number of patients treated at the 58 hospitals were 42,614, staffed by 883 doctors and 254,090 nurses and support staff.StatsCan 1927-28 p. 963-964

In 1927, Matthew S Anderson, Councillor of the Rural Municipality (RM) of McKillop 220 attended the Saskatchewan Association of Rural Municipality (SARM) Convention and proposed a health insurance plan based on the model from his home country – Norway. However SARM delegates could not see the feasibility of the proposal with the taxation scheme afforded to the RMs of that era. These localities were served by thirteen doctors; Holdfast (Rural Municipality of Sarnia No 221), Craik (RM of Craik No. 222 ), Beechy (RM of Victory No 226 ), Bethune (RM of DufferinNo No 190), Birsay (RM Of Coteau No 255), Brock (RM of Kindersley No 290 ), Chamberlain (RM of Sarnia No. 221), Freemont (RM of Hillsdale No. 440), Leroy (RM Of LeRoy No 339), Lintlaw (RM of Hazel Dell No. 335), Rush Lake (RM Of Excelsior No 16), and Senlac (RM of Senlac No. 411.).Houston and Massie. P. 28

 

Dirty Thirties

Drought and the economic depression years hit the prairies hard in the 1930s. It was a difficult time, medical institutions and health care practitioners were facing hard times, salaries could not be met, and renovations and improvements were forsaken. Settlers did not have money, crops failed, grasshoppers took whatever crop survived the heat and the early frost took the rest. The tremendous heat wave took an unprecedented number of lives. The huge dust storms caused dust Pneumonia, a respiratory disease affecting everyone across the plains. Russian thistle, (tumbleweed) was pretty much the only plant which grew during this decade. Not only people were short of food, but livestock were starving. The local doctor was lucky to earn $27 a month.

Beginning in 1931, special grants were provided by the provincial Relief Medical Services Branch to physicians and hospitals to allow them to proffer services to residents unable to pay for health care. The Bureau of Labour, and Public Welfare and Northern Settlers Branch of the Department of Municipal Affairs receive medical advice from the Relief Medical Services Branch.CYB 1939 p. 1035 ‘Northern Settlers’ were those single transients and transient families who transferred to the northern area of the province seeking better conditions away from the drought area in the southern section of the province.CYB 1941 p. 908In 1931, C. Rufus Rorem reported thirty two municipalities with doctors working under the municipal doctor plan.”Twenty had twenty-one full time doctors; twelve other municipalities had part-time agreements with sixteen physicians”

In 1938, the provincial government under Premier William John Patterson, proposed that Anderson set out the health service insurance plan for his RM. Anderson had been reeve since 1930 and a councillor since 1922 and worked towards his goal of Providing a cooperative health system – during the dirty thirties, the finances of the community was desperate, and few to none could afford any health care at all. “The initial tax was $5 per person up to a maximum of $50 per family. The population covered was 2,350.”Anderson p. 64 The RM of McKillop, town of Strasbourg, and the two villages of Bulyea and Silton were covered becoming “Health District No. 1

 

Municipal and Medical Hospital Services Act

or the “Matt Anderson Act

Matt Anderson in the Rural Municipality of McKillop No 220 instigated the passing of the Municipal and Medical Hospital Services Act (the “Matt Anderson Act“) in November 1938 which allowed any group larger than ten persons to incorporate a health insurance plan. From this statute, RMs could supply hospital and medical services to the rural community by levying either a land tax or a personal tax. After this act was passed The RM of Strasbourg and Silton (RM Pittville No, 169) also followed the RM of McKillop No. 220 passing a similar bylaw to take advantage of the new legislation that same year. Anderson travelled to other regions introducing the concept. RM of Caledonia No 99, RM Of Chester No 125, RM of Lajord No 128, RM of Lumsden No 189, RM of Longlaketon No 219 established municipal medical plans by 1941. The RM of Webb No 138 followed by 1943.

The new health care plan met with favourable press, and incited keen interest across the province. The main alteration in health care was that doctors submitted their bills to the municipality rather than to each individual patient. In this way physicians were paid monthly. In 1938, Dr. R. G. Ferguson tallied 546 provincial doctors, of which 121 were under some sort of municipal contract.Houston and Massie p. 33

Commercial insurance companies sprang up providing support for the residents of Saskatchewan in the face of unpredictable medical and hospital care.Taylor p3-4 Doctor sponsored schemes such as Medical Services Incorporated, Saskatoon Medical and Hospital Benefit Association, Regina Mutual Medical Benefit Association, Group Medical Services, were some of the agencies which arose to meet the health care needs in urban and rural areas. These proved invaluable to the residents of Saskatchewan following World War II when the province began restructuring after the war effort and veterans returned home.

In 1941, the Dr. John J. Collins questionnaire received this reply from one of the rural doctors; “Any system is to be preferred to the present. Collections appear hopeless. I do not know how medical men can hope to carry on out here [all year] under present and future conditions.”Houston and Massie p. 33

 

Health Services Board Inquiries

Over 1939 and 1940 Statistics Canada reported that the “Health Services Board…is inquiring into the extent and administration of the various health services existing in the province, collecting and studying data on the general situation regarding incidence of illness from all causes, considering methods for an equitable distribution of the costs of illness, studying the needs of the people with respect to general health services, and the necessity of co-ordination of those now existing.”CYB 1939 p. 1035

The Saskatchewan Health Services Planning Commission was implemented In 1946, with Dr. Cecil G. Sheps as Acting Chairman, and Dr. Mindel G. Sheps, leader of the commission. Dr. Fred Mott was the chair for the Commission, and he also headed up the “Saskatchewan Health Survey Report” began in 1947 and completed in 1951. Dr. Len Rosenfeld served as Mott’s deputy. The Hospital Insurance Act -Saskatchewan Hospital Services Plan (SHSP)- came into effect on January 1, of 1947 which provided Saskatchewan residents with free hospital care in the province. It wouldn’t be until November 17, 1961 when the Saskatchewan Medical Care Insurance Act was passed, and the dream of Medicare in the province.

 

Swift Current Health Region No. 1 – pilot project.

The Secretary treasurer, W.J. Burak, in the RM of Pittville travelled to Bulyea to meet with the secretary to gather information to take back to Swift Current. “What many new comers may not know is that Swift Current and the region surrounding had the pilot plan for the whole scheme, inaugurated in 1946; thus pioneered the whole business. We had a plebiscite and it carried. Plebiscites in other regions of Saskatchewan lost.”Greenblat 30

Just as Anderson had done in the area of Bulyea, so too did Burak in the Swift Current Health Region also reach out to settlers in the south western area of the province with success. It was thus that Swift Current Health Region No. 1 was born.

Swift Current Health Region No. 1 and Weyburn Health Region No. 3 offered a complete medical care plan including diagnostic, out patient services, general practitioner and specialist services in addition to the Hospital Services Plan. Swift Current Health Region was chosen as a pilot project due to the financial straits of the settlers, and the fact that there was a distinct lack of doctors practising in the area. The land in this corner of the province had started out in the late 1800s and early 1900s as ranch land -pastures and ranges- in the south western portion of the province, and was converting to agricultural mixed farming with a corresponding rise in the population.

[The Swift Current Plan before Medicare] -For a maximum of $96 per year, paid out of personal and land taxes, even the largest Swift Current region family is totally covered for every medical necessity, from sore throat to hospital stay. There is also a small “utilization fee” to discourage needless medical visits – $1 for office calls, $2 for house calls, $3 for medical service late at night or on Sundays.”Cannel Aug 2, 1962.

For 14 years. Swift Current and area residents enjoyed the successful pilot program, physicians “submits his bill for services rendered to the health office in Swift Current which pays him 80 per cent of the fee. …He makes out better by settling for 80 per cent and frequently comes out with a yearly income of #25,000. ‘That is some $7,000 more than the average Saskatchewan doctor elsewhere earns.’ “Cannel July 14, 1962.

Bibliography

Julia Adamson: Author and Webmaster Sask Gen Web E Magazine

Turn to Part 2

Questions:

It is quite natural that Canadians used to medicare are bringing up the controversy regarding the United States Obamacare program in their conversations.
This is an interesting time, observing the reactions, positive or negative that Americans are having with these new insurance policies. We, as Canadians may indeed be wondering how anyone could be against it.




However, in Canada when medicare was introduced, there was in fact, a 23 day strike against Canadian medicare that made international headlines. In contemporary times, few remember the inauguration of medicare, and the strike in health care service that lasted three weeks, a time during the summer of 1962 not to be critically ill.



This experiences are a reminder of the need to preserve personal memories of these events, especially as those who can remember through these times are now are at least in their sixties.


Please take the time to fill out our online survey; https://eSurv.org?u=Medicare Saskatchewan MediCare & Doctor’s Strike – 1962 Survey asking these questions:

What are your memories of the doctor’s strike in 1962? Were you working in the medical field at the time?

What are your memories of life before medicare?

Where did you live?

How old were you (teens, twenties, etc.)?

How did you get information (newspapers, radio, TV)?

Was medicare or the strike a topic of conversation at home or work?

Were you or family members concerned about your health during the strike?

Were you covered by a municipal plan, MSI or other insurance?

If you worked in the medical field, what was the attitude of co-workers?

Email Marilyn Decker, – – granddaughter of Matthew (Matthias) Anderson if you have observations, comments or suggestions you could share.

https://eSurv.org?u=Medicare Saskatchewan MediCare & Doctor’s Strike – 1962 Survey

Saskatchewan’s Health Care Evolution Towards Medicare – Part 2

6 Aug

Saskatchewan’s Health Care Evolution Towards Medicare

Part II

Medical Logo with Hands

Medical Logo with hands

Go to Part I

Tommy Douglas and the CCF

“Tommy Douglas’s Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (CCF) government was elected to power on July 10, 1944 with this promise:’ To set up a complete system of socialized health services with special emphasis on preventive medicine, so that everybody will receive adequate medical surgical, dental, nursing and hospital care without charge.'”Greenblat 30 The depression years followed by World War II had placed a strain on the province’s population. The citizen’s were ready for a improvements in the rural health care services, and access to medical care for the general public. The best that Premier William Patterson, Saskatchewan Liberal Party, could do would be to pass The Saskatchewan Health Insurance Act to take advantage of any new federal legislation which may profer funding for health care.

1944, there were now 101 municipal doctors in the province.Houston and Massie p. 34

Dr. Henry E. Sigerist, a professor of Medical History, was appointed as the head of a Health Services Survey Commission (HSSC) on June 15, 1944, and the report was finished October 4 that same year. Dr. Mindel Sheps, (CCF), was appointed secretary of the Sigerist Commission C. Stuart Houston sums up the salient points of the Sigerist Report; “He [Sigerist] recommended establishment of district health regions for preventive medicine, each centred on a district hospital equipped with an x-ray machine, a medical laboratory, and an ambulance. He advocated rural health centres of eight to ten maternity beds, staffed by a registered nurse and one or more municipal doctors. He proposed that the municipal doctor plans should be maintained and developed. He noted that the public must be educated to seek medical advice at the centre, so that doctors would no longer spend a large part of their time driving around the country.”Houston: Sigerist Commission By 1950, the province saw 173 municipal doctors practising in the province.Houston and Massie p. 34

The HSPC continued on with C.C. Gibson, Superintendent of the Regina General Hospital; T.H. McLeod government’s economic advisor; and Dr. M.C. Sheps. As a result, health regions were created. “The Regional Health Services Branch is responsible for the organization and administration of health regions: six of fourteen potential regions are in operation. Regional Health Boards assisted by advisory committees administer general public health services. Health Districts within the Region are represented on a District Health Council. … In many districts within the other Regions, a municipal doctor system is in operation. Medical services are provided under a contract between the municipal authority and medical practitioner. …Hospital care is available to all residents under a compulsory hospital plan, which is financed by an annual tax of $10 for adults and $5 for children, with a $30 family maximum; any further funds needed are provided by the Provincial Treasury.”CYB 1951. p. 212 The Saskatchewan Hospitalization Act was passed in legislature on April 4, 1956.

Dr. Noel Doig relates that when he set up a practice in Hawarden, 1957, “the basic payment from the surrounding township of Rosedale for holding office hours in Hawarden would be $100 per month, and the payment from the township of Loreburn for holding two weekly sessions in a satellite office in the village of that name would be $100 per quarter. …Fees for medical care would be over and above the stipulated contract payments….I’d [Doig] also been able to secure my appointment to the staff of Outlook Hospital, 26 miles away along two gravel high3ways (No. 19 to its junction with No. 15…)”Doig p. 5-6

“The federal government passed the Hospital Insurance and Diagnostic Services Act in 1957, which offered to reimburse, or cost share, one-half of provincial and territorial costs for specified hospital and diagnostic services. This Act provided for publicly administered universal coverage for a specific set of services under uniform terms and conditions.”Health Canada

In December of 1959, – the year that the “incidence of paralytic poliomyelitis rose in all provinces to tis highest level since vaccination began” – Premier Tommy Douglas “announced that an advisory planning committee representing the government, the university, the medical profession and the general public would be set up to make representations to the government of medical care.” Archer p. 303. J. Walter Erb, health minister announced the names of the Thompson’s planning committee in the spring of 1960.

This committee after visiting numerous countries, -Australia, New Zealand, Great Britain, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, and Holland- and examining the structure of doctor sponsored plans submitted their interim report September 25, 1961. November 7, 1961, Tommy Douglas, elected as the leader of the newly formed New Democrat party, stepped down as premier. Woodrow Stanley Lloyd of the CCF party, succeeded Douglas as the premier of Saskatchewan. On November 17, 1961, the CCF party passed the Saskatchewan Medical Care Insurance Act. On November 21, 1961, this same government appointed William Gwynne Davies {an initiator of the Saskatchewan Federation of Labour (SFL)} as Minister of Public Health.

In 1961, Statistics Canada reported that public medical care programs are existant for three provinces. Saskatchewan locally operated municipal-doctor programs cover about 158,000 persons, and Manitoba covers about 28,000. “The Swift Current Health Region operates a comprehensive prepaid medical-dental and out-patient hospital care scheme for about 53,000 persons. These latter programs are subsidized to some extent by provincial health departments.”SYB 1961 p. 236

Provincial Medical Care and Doctor’s Strike

On July 1, 1962, Saskatchewan began operating a provincial medical care insurance program. Following his tenure on Thompson’s Planning Committee, Barootes, as president of the Saskatchewan Medical Association (SMA) presided over the Doctor’s Strike, July 1, 1962 which lasted 23 days. Lord Stephen Taylor from the British House of Lords arrived to Canada at the request of Premier Lloyd, and negotiated an end to the strike between the medical profession represented by the SMA and the cabinet supporting the Medical Care Insurance Commission.

Before Medical Care locally operated municipal doctor programs in receipt of provincial grants served the population. “Since July 1962, every person who has resided in the Province of Saskatchewan for three months…and has paid…and premium he is required to pay under the Saskatchewan Medical Care Act, is entitled to have payment made on his behalf from the Saskatchewan Medical Care Insurance Fund, for medical, surgical and obstetrical care, without limit, in the office, home or hospital, from his physician of choice…Physicians providing insured medical services may elect to receive payment in a number of ways:

  • they may contract for a salary…
  • they may choose to receive direct payment from the administering public agency, the Medical Insurance Commission…
  • they may bill their patients directly, the patient in turn being paid by the Commission, on presentation of an itemized account (bill) or receipt…
  • the physician my practice for private fees, whereby the patient assumes all responsibility for payment of the doctor’s fee….”CYB 1963-1964 p. 273

“Municipal doctor plans formerly operating in Saskatchewan were discontinued with the introduction of the province-wide medical insurance program, but arrangements were being completed in the spring of 1963 to continue, under local auspices, insured medical services for some 57,000 residents of the Swift Current Health Region which as operated a prepaid medical-dental program for nearly 17 years.” CYB 1963-1964 p. 275

“The Saskatchewan medical care insurance program is financed from personal premiums plus general revenue contributions. No premiums were levied in respect of 1962, but an annual premium of $12 per adult or a maximum annual premium of $24 per family has been levied for 1963 for medical care coverage. Special corporation and personal income taxes have been introduced…along with the use of a portion of revenues from a 5-p.c. retail sales tax.”CYB 1963-1964 p. 275

In Conclusion

The federal government stepped in with funding in 1968 to support medical insurance. Leonard Shifrin noted that 8 provinces of Canada modeled health care upon Saskatchewan’s medicare plan by 1979 and the CBC states the entire nation was covered by a medicare plan within ten years of the Saskatchewan Doctor’s strike. Saskatchewan’s motto; “Multis E Gentibus Vires”, Latin for “In Many People’s Strength” represents the great cooperative community spirit, which when combined with “the right person in the right place at the right time” paved the way for Saskatchewan to become a leader in medicare.Houston and Massie p. 143

>
In closing, this brief encapsulation offers an overview of the evolution of health care in Saskatchewan. It is hoped that it may inspire you to reflect on the politics, the health care services, and the effect the various health care systems had on the communities. Please be inspired to comment, compare or contrast how health care impacted their own life experiences. Though this review does not include medical breakthroughs, or technological inventions, nor does it contain the emotions – the hopes and fears – however it does review the history of key events, and some of the key people behind formal legislation paving the way towards medicare. As we are collecting information, comments, feedback, and any reminiscences you may have are greatly appreciated.

Questions:

It is quite natural that Canadians used to medicare are bringing up the controversy regarding the United States Obamacare program in their conversations.
This is an interesting time, observing the reactions, positive or negative that Americans are having with these new insurance policies. We, as Canadians may indeed be wondering how anyone could be against it.




However, in Canada when medicare was introduced, there was in fact, a 23 day strike against Canadian medicare that made international headlines. In contemporary times, few remember the inauguration of medicare, and the strike in health care service that lasted three weeks, a time during the summer of 1962 not to be critically ill.



This experiences are a reminder of the need to preserve personal memories of these events, especially as those who can remember through these times are now are at least in their sixties.


Please take the time to fill out our online survey; https://eSurv.org?u=Medicare Saskatchewan MediCare & Doctor’s Strike – 1962 Survey asking these questions:


What are your memories of the doctor’s strike in 1962? Were you working in the medical field at the time?

What are your memories of life before medicare?

What are your memories of life before medicare?

Where did you live?

How old were you (teens, twenties, etc.)?

How did you get information (newspapers, radio, TV)?

Was medicare or the strike a topic of conversation at home or work?

Were you or family members concerned about your health during the strike?

Were you covered by a municipal plan, MSI or other insurance?

If you worked in the medical field, what was the attitude of co-workers?

Please contact Marilyn Decker, – – granddaughter of Matthew (Matthias) Anderson if you have any memories or reminiscences you could share. 


https://eSurv.org?u=Medicare Saskatchewan MediCare & Doctor’s Strike – 1962 Survey

Will These World War I War Medals Make Their Way Home?

14 Jul

 

Will These World War I War Medals Make Their Way Home?

Can you help?

The British War Medal World War I.

The British War Medal World War I.


…..Peter Willcock began a search to locate the descendants of a World War I veteran in the hopes to restore the war medals to the John Bryson’s family ancestors. Beginning in Ontario, this mystery unravels with ancestral clues found overseas in Scotland, and continues with a search for descendants in Western Canada – Saskatchewan and Manitoba. It is hoped that the family of John Bryson can be located.

…..Willcock is helping a friend to track down the family. “When my friend was a boy, his family moved into a a rental house in what today is the Toronto area. That’s probably about 50 years ago now. There was a pile of junk in the basement which his mother asked him to clean out. In the process he found this WW1 medal, and he kept it all these years until maybe 5-6 years ago when he tried to start looking for some family member or descendant who might like to have the medal.”

…..Willcock came to his friend’s assistance as he had a computer whereas, his friend was not online. In the course of their online research they have delved into quite a lot of information. They feel that they may have possibly identified grand nieces or nephews in Scotland.

John Bryson

…..The veteran’s name is John Bryson; Regimental Number 105984; who resided on a farm in Indian Head, Saskatchewan in the year 1921. He was single, and aged 38. He was born Eaglesham, Renfrewshire, Scotland in October 31, 1883. He reported an address of Palmer House, Regina, Saskatchewan when he enlisted April 4, 1916. James Bryson, of Cambuslang, Lanarkshire, Scotland was given as his next of kin – his father. John’s employment was recorded as teamster.
…..In the book, Indian Head : history of Indian Head and district on page 165, the local history book committee state that James Bryson was wounded in World War I, and no other “Bryson” are listed in the World War I honour roll. There is another Bryson mentioned in the book, however, that of Jean Bryson who married James Harvey Francis (1859 Pakenham, Ontario-), namesake of the town of Francis. Miss Jean Craig Bryson (Mrs. Jean Francis) was the daughter of the Honourable Senator George Bryson of Fort Coulonge, Quebec, and together they had a son, Jonathon Francis. George Bryson, Sr. was the son of James Bryson and Jane Cochrane and arrived in 1814 to Ramsay, Lanark, Ontario. George married Robina Cobb in 1845, and had seven children – two of whom were George Bryson Junior, and Thomas Bryson. However, this book makes no mention of John Bryson at all, unless he went by a nick name of James Bryson. Nor is there any evidence that John Bryson was related to the aforementioned Jean Bryson and the notable Bryson figures from Quebec.

…..

Alexander Sr. Bryson (Sandy)

…..It is believed that Alexander Sr. Bryson (Sandy) was John’s uncle, and that Alexander lived in Sintaluta, Saskatchewan. Alexander (1869-Sept 21, 1958) was born 1869 in Eaglesham, Scotland, and had five children after he married Jeanie Moffat (1867-1920). Sandy arrived in 1911, and his family followed in 1912. He lived on township 17 range 11 west of the second meridian. His children were (William) James (1893 – 1933), Alex Jr. (1895-1916 threshing accident), John (Jack) (1897- ), Tom (1900- ), and a daughter Jeanie aged 12 on the 1916 census. Jean went on to marry Mr. Boyd and reside in Vantage, Saskatchewan. Jack and Thomas themselves, relocated to Winnipeg, Manitoba according to page 338 of the book, Sintaluta 1880-1984 / Tales of the Red Fox: Assiniboine Reserve, Town of Sintaluta, Districts of Allindale, Durham, Blackwood, Red Fox, and Spring Coulee.

…..The eldest of the family, listed as William in the local history book, and as James on the Canadian Census, enlisted July 28, 1915, recorded his occupation as a farmer at Sintaluta, and married. James Bryson 115055, lists Cambuslang, Scotland, as his place of birth on his enlistment record and went overseas with the 10th Canadian Mounted Rifles.

….Another brother, Corporal John Bryson 115056, born December 10, 1897, enlisted December 19, 1914, at Shorncliff and states that he is, at the time, an unmarried farmer. His next of kin listed was Alexander Bryson, of Sintaluta, Saskatchewan. He also was born in Cambuslang, Scotland. John was placed with the 10th Canadian Mounted Rifles.

….The youngest brother, SPR Thomas Bryson 2504238, enlisted with a birth date of June 9, 1899, and gave his mother, Jeanie Bryron, of Sintaluta, Saskatchewan as his next of kin. It was a practice for younger men to alter their birth dates in order to enlist and serve their country. Sapper (abbreviated Spr) is the Royal Engineers’ equivalent of Private He listed that he was a labourer when he signed up in Winnipeg, Manitoba on June 1, 1918. Tom recorded Glasgow, Scotland as his location of birth. He initially served with Regina Recruits Engineers.

Location

…..According to Map quest Indian Head and Sintaluta are 18 kilometers (11 miles) apart, and both are currently located on the Trans – Canada 1 highway. In the era of horse and buggy or ox and cart this would enable relatives to help one another out during times of harvest. On average, a horse walks at approximately 4 miles per hour (6.5 km/hour) which would make it a three hour journey between Indian Head and Sintaluta. It was common that relatives would homestead and farm near one another to assist with homestead duties and harvest.

…..On an historical railway map of 1925, it can be see that Indian Head and Sintaluta were both on the Canadian Pacific Transcontinental Railway (West). Indian Head, the closer of the two locations to the provincial capital of Regina is 70 kilomters (44 miles) from that city. Indian Head locates at the legal land location of section 24- township 18- range 13-West of the second meridian at Latitude – Longitude (DMS) 50° 32′ 1″ N, 103° 40′ 3″ W, and Sintaluta at section 33- township 17 – range 11-West of the 2nd meridian or Latitude – Longitude (DMS) 50° 28′ 37″ N, 103° 26′ 59″ W.

…..It is interesting to note that the “The Bryson Maur School Dist No 3312 historical one room school house was located on the SE quarter of section 29 township 24 range 19 W2″. Bill Barry gives the spelling of this same school house as Bryn Mawr school 33312 at the same location; SE 29 24 19 W2. Barry attributes the name to a settler from Wales who named it after Brynmawr in Wales, so it is not likely that the first name Bryson Maur had any roots in this Bryson family.

Can you help?

…..It is with heartfelt wishes that some kind reader recognizes the family, and can come forward as an ancestor of John Bryson, the holder of these World War One Medals. Perhaps the The Royal Canadian Legion may be able to help out. They even have a Sintaluta branch, and an Indian Head branch and so they may even know this John Bryson. “Legion members care deeply about supporting the men and women who serve this country and want to make a difference in the lives of Veterans, contribute to our communities, and Remember those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our Country…The Royal Canadian Legion [members] …. make a difference in the lives of Veterans and their families, provide essential services within our communities, and Remember the men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice for our Country.”

…..Perhaps the Indian Head townspeople can know of the family and can pinpoint the relations of John Bryson, or similarly, Sintaluta historians may remember the family of Alexander Bryson. In this way, the relatives can contact Willcock. The Winnipeg library or archives may have information about John (Jack) Bryson or Tom Bryson in an Henderson’s Directory. The hamlet of or “designated place” of Vantage is considered a ghost town. It may be that the Rural Municipality No. 103 – SUTTON would have information about the residents, and Mrs. Jeanie (nee Bryson) Boyd who took residence there.

….. Trying to identify the family of John Bryson presents a mystery, indeed, to Willcock, and his friend. With a few key details, they are trying to locate the rightful owner of the military medals. By furthering their enquiry online and receiving tips, Willcock searched outside of the province of Ontario. to seek out the rightful owner.

…..In Australia and New Zealand, the Purple Hearts Reunited are groups of researchers have come together to return lost medals to veterans or to their families. With success stories such as lost war medals returned after facebook post, it is hoped, that these war medals, too, may make their way back to John Bryson’s ancestors.

…..These precious mementos bestowed upon a Canadian military veteran, would come home at last if they could be restored. Medals “connect recipients to a time in their lives when serving our nation took precedence over all else. ” As the centenary of the First World War (1914-1918) is being commemorated and remembered, what fitting tribute, that to find the home of a distinctive, original, valuable, irreplaceable medal. This would provide the family with an ancestral connection to their family member who served, and who fought for our country. The medals themselves, honour the man, John Bryson, and the sacrifices he made for this country of Canada.

Bibliography:

Geographic Names of Saskatchewan
Barry, Bill. Centax Books, A Division of PrintWest Communications Ltd. 2005. ISBN 1-897020-19-2

Indian Head: History of Indian Head and District.

The History Book Committee
Indian Head, Saskatchewan The History Book Committee 1984

ISBN Number 0919781268 / 9780919781269

Sintaluta 1880-1984 / Tales of the Red Fox
Assiniboine Reserve, Town of Sintaluta, Districts of Allindale, Durham, Blackwood, Red Fox, and Spring Coulee

Chabun, Will. Mini-mystery surrounds Sask. Veteran’s medal. Regina Leader Post. July 28, 2015. Article also appears: Star Phoenix Facebook Star Phoenix

Published 1985 by Sintaluta & District History Book Committee .
ISBN 10 0889254982

All online sources are embedded in the text of the story as hyper links.

To contribute or add further information, please e-mail

The above web page was created and placed online by
author Julia Adamson ,
and researcher
Peter Willcock

Prairie History Blog Review

25 May

Regina Public Library Prairie History Blog Review

In this day of age with genealogical sites coming online, it is hard to determine which way to turn amidst the plethora of sites appearing from a search engine investigation.

The Regina Public Library has come up with a wonderful solution with their Prairie History Blog The blog originated with the purpose of informing their visitors about the new items added to their collection; recommending some of the best online genealogy resources; and notifications of any upcoming genealogy and heritage-related workshops and events in the Regina community or around province.

RPL, Regina Public Library, Card Catalog, Library Card Catalog

Regina Public Library Prairie History Blog Card Catalogue

Not only does the Prairie History Blog provide updates about new magazines, and books available in the Prairie History Room, Regina Public Library, but they also have information about recommended websites, their updates and new features. Website with early postcards of Prairie towns is one of these articles.

Enhancing the value of the New Magazines now available, the blog is replete with the article titles in each issue, in a milieu of magazines be it Folklore by the Saskatchewan History and Folklore Society, National Genealogical Society Quarterly, Alberta History, Families, Your Genealogy Today, Manitoba History, Internet Genealogy, Relatively Speaking, Revue Historique, or the Saskatchewan Genealogy Society Bulletin.

Books

New books available for research

An informative category is New Saskatchewan Records added to FamilySearch. The digitisation process of the Regina Public Library has made them keenly aware of their own growth and expansion and in this realization they have also been able to keep abreast of exciting new digital additions appearing on the internet.

As the Regina Public Library system has subscribed to Ancestry Library Edition (ALE) and access is provided in each of their nine branches. The Prairie History Blog provides updates at regular intervals to newly digitised projects which have become available on ALE.

Genealogy presentations are provided in house at the Regina Public Library, but for distance learning or in case you missed it, the many and varied slide shows and transcripts of their presentations are preserved online. A few of these presentations are entitled Revised and Updated Version of Best Genealogy Websites and Tools of 2014 , Tracing your Canadian World War I Ancestors, Best Genealogy Websites 2012 part 2, Researching Military Records. and Chinese footprints across Canada 2014 version.

The Regina Public Library has made their blog a pleasure to use highlighting articles with images, and an easily accessible style providing excellent categories to find similar articles for further research and information. In their passion to provide digital information, they have started the Prairie History Room’s New Virtual Scrapbook on the Regina Public Library Flickr page which was launched with over 200 historical photographs. St. Andrew’s Thistle Football Club is represented with 22 photos, 18 images provide the scene of the historic Regina Tornado and the Nurses’ Training at Regina General Hospital feature amongst historical images of Regina,  Regina library events and branches.

The Regina Public History Blog is a wonderful Genealogy and Heritage Newsletter. If you cannot make it into the Regina Public Library in person, please do take time to peruse their virtual presence, where you can be introduced to the Prairie History Collection, find useful information in their Research Guides, view their photo albums, and indulge in the current blog articles and archives

The Regina Public Library blog and Flickr page are also supported by the facebook page and Web Site.

Online Family History Tree Research

Online Family History Tree Research
enhanced by the Regina Prairie History Blog

Embracing the new millennium, the Regina Public Library has established an informative and insightful virtual presence. Experience their social networking sites and venues the Regina Public Library offers a fantastic online presence.  They  provide information about new additions to the Prairie History Room Collection, allow genealogists to become aware of the better online genealogy resources available, and on top of this they provide genealogy workshops, and notifications of upcoming genealogical related events in Saskatchewan.

It is not often that one finds a blog as useful and as informative as the Regina Public Library’s Prairie History Blog. The Blog shows us just how rich and vibrant the history of Saskatchewan is, and how much the pioneers of this prairie province are treasured in our genealogical research.

 

 

 

 

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University of Saskatchewan Remembers World War I

9 Aug

World War One Remembered at the University of Saskatchewan

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration CommitteeHonourRollAddendum-Professor Dean McNeil trumpet solo-2
Honour Roll Addendum
Professor Dean McNeil Trumpet Solos The Last Post and Reveille

On Thursday August 7, 2014 the “Honouring our heroes” program commemorated those students, faculty and staff who fought in the First World War (1914-1918) in Convocation Hall, Peter MacKinnon Building on the University of Saskatchewan Campus. According to the University of Saskatchewan media advisory, Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer, Interim President and Vice-Chancellor Gordon Barnhart, and history student Eric Story related that this is the first of many commemorative events planned in honour of the centennial year. World War I commenced August 4, 1914.

Pezer recounted that while World War I “produced unprecedented slaughter” of those “sent forth to the Great War”, the effects of the war had a “profound effect upon the province” as well as established a “growing sense of national pride.” “Beyond fighting there were many ways that the University” contributed to the war effort, such as chaplin Edmund Oliver who joined the Western Universities Battalion with the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF). Edmund helped to establish the University of Vimy Ridge and worked on the battle fields in France serving the sick, the wounded soldiers, and advising families when enlisted personnel gave the supreme sacrifice.

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee veiled plaques honouring our heroes
Veiled Plaques Honouring our heroes
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee r, Interim President and Vice-Chancellor Gordon Barnhart - history student Eric Story-Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer
Interim President and Vice-Chancellor Gordon Barnhart, history student Eric Story, Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer.
Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee veiled plaques honouring our heroes Interim President and Vice-Chancellor Gordon Barnhart - history student Eric Story-Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer
Interim President and Vice-Chancellor Gordon Barnhart, history student Eric Story, Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer

Research conducted by Professor Emeritus of History, Michael Hayden, found those names missing during the original commemoration services held by the University of Saskatchewan. 349 men and one woman are named on the walls of the Peter McKinnon Building National Historic Site of Canada (the former College Building ). Memorial ribbons are inscribed with the names of 298 military personnel, noting additionally those who were wounded wounded, or killed in action. Accompanying the ribbons are 34 names mostly of the Royal Air Force. Another 23 names commemorate the volunteer nurses of the Emmanuel College Hospital who served during the 1918 Influenza Epidemic. The names of 18 service personnel were dedicated at this ceremony on a plaque unveiled August 7, 2014. This plaque will be mounted outside of Convocation Hall and in this way these eighteen heroes of World War I will be honoured prominently in the first building erected on the University of Saskatchewan grounds.

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee slide show
Slide Show
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Eric Story History Student
Eric Story History Student University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Interview of MichaelHayden at Honouring our Heroes
Interview of MichaelHayden at Honouring our Heroes
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee JGDiefenbakerMemorialRibbon
J.G. Diefenbaker Memorial Ribbon

Following speeches given by Pezer, Barnhart and Story, the names of those commemorated on the plaque were read out. The “Last Post” trumpet solo rang out by Professor Dean McNeil. A moment of silence followed and then the “Reveille” trumpet solo rung out paying especial tribute to those students, faculty and staff named upon the plaque.

O Valiant Hearts.

World War I hymn

O valiant hearts who to your glory came

Through dust of conflict and through battle flame;

Tranquil you lie, your knightly virtue proved,

Your memory hallowed in the land you loved.

~ Sir John Stanhope Arkwright

 

Barnhart related a lesson taken on by history students where each pupil in the class was assigned a country. The assignment was to “trace through hour by hour and day by day the events leading up to … August 4, 1914, the beginning of the first world war one”. Such an indepth study brings home the politics one hundred years ago, that even though August 4 officially started the war, there were many contributing factors and forces in play which finally gave way to the imminence of war.

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Memorial Ribbons Admiration
Memorial Ribbons Admiration
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Petty Officer 1st Class Warren Noble CD Recruiter
University of Saskatchewan
Memorial Ribbons Plaque
Petty Officer 1st Class Warren Noble CD Recruiter
HMCS Unicorn
National Defence
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Honour Roll Addendum Professor Dean McNeil Trumpet Solos
Honour Roll Addendum ~ Professor Dean McNeil Trumpet Solos
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Petty Officer 1st Class Warren Noble CD Recruiter Sub Lieutenant Alicia Morris
Petty Officer 1st Class Warren Noble CD Recruiter
Sub Lieutenant Alicia Morris
HMCS Unicorn
National Defence

Though the University had only been open for seven years, Barnhart recounts that within three months of the First World War commencement, a recruitment program was in place. Seventy five per cent of the student body saw active service. Alongside students, staff and faculty served in the war effort. So many were absent from the College of Engineering, that it was forced to close during the 1916-7 academic year amid the Great War.

Regarding the students enrolled on the University campus in 1914; “It’s highly traumatic for that small academic community, because these people were walking beside them a short time before, and now they’re in the army, and now they’re dead.” ~ James Pitsula retired University of Regina History Professor.[[1]

Students were given one year’s credit towards their degree program which at the time they felt was a triumphant entitlement as the war was predicted to last short of one year. Faculty positions were held for all those who had enlisted.

During the renovations of the Peter McKinnon building a special insulation was installed over the memorial ribbons which was then encased in plywood casings to preserve the historic carvings. In this way no paint, no hammer nor any construction event could damage the commemorative ribbons.

“War changed Canada,” Barnhart affirmed, “in many ways Canada was no longer a colony”. Canada may have entered the Great War as a colony, however emerged as a country in its own right signing the armistice alongside the Allies of World War I on November 11, 1918.

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Memorial GSwift-JDCumming-HJBlair-MemorialRibbons
G Swift-J D Cumming-H J Blair-Memorial Ribbons

Story spoke on behalf of the University of Saskatchewan’s Great War Commemoration Committee which is chaired by Professor Emeritus Bill Waiser. This ceremony, the “Remember Us – Honouring our heroes” unveiling ceremony is the inaugural event sponsored by the Great War Commemoration Committee, there will be many more memorial events upcoming in the next four years.

Joseph Boyden has been scheduled to give a talk about two aboriginal snipers of World War I whom he wrote about in the much acclaimed novel, “Three Day Road”. There is in the making the “Great War Soiree” which will feature a theatrical number, and a musical score in tribute to the First World War.

In the works, is a public talk by Brain Gable, University of Saskatchewan alumnus, and award winning cartoonist for the Globe and Mail. Gable depicts editorial or political cartoons, containing commentaries and illustrations relating to the effects that the Great War had on society during the contemporary news releases of the Great War Centenary. His cartoons provide insight into issues and historical context of World War I embracing sensitivity, seriousness and satire on the outcome of events with a point of view 100 years later.

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee College Building Plaque
College Building Plaque
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Memorial Peter McKinnon Building National Historic Site College Building
Peter McKinnon-(College Building) National Historic Site
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Peter McKinnon Building -College Building Plaque.
Peter McKinnon Building -College Building Plaque

Proposals yet to come from the Great War Commemoration Committee may feature the following. In 2016, a feature based upon the “The Antiques Road Show” will take place showcasing memorabilia, artefacts and antiques from the Great War. A culinary week is in progress studying the recipes and foods sustaining the appetites during the First World War years. Finally in 2018, the University of Saskatchewan Archives website will be completed and expanded with an grand ceremony unveiling featured topics such as “How to research”, blogs and articles on the Great War.

The Soul of the Soldier
Sketches from the Western Battle-Front

A Belgian Poem

“I came to a halt at the bend of the road;

I reached for my ration, and loosened my load;

I came to a halt at the bend of the road.

“For thee that I loved, I went down to the grave,

Pay thou the like forfeit thy Country to save;

For thee that I loved, I went down to the grave.

“Fulfilled is the sacrifice. Lord, is it well?

Be it said–for the dear sake of country he fell.

Fulfilled is the sacrifice. Lord, is it well?”

by Thomas Tiplady

While Story suggests these aformentioned ceremonies as tantalizing morsels of events yet to come over the next four years, it is by no means an exhaustive list. To follow more about plans undertaken by the Great War Commemoration Committee please see their facebook page and twitter page online.

World War I ~ “The war to end all wars”~ how is it remembered? The Great War Commemoration Committee tackles the issues, the evolution, and culture of the war years, and its impact on the University and its role in the greater community of the city of Saskatoon, the province of Saskatchewan the nation of Canada on the world stage. The evolution of the University was inevitable and dramatic during the war years contrasting sharply with the life of contemporary students, faculty and staff. The University of Saskatchewan’s motto Deo et Patriæ (Latin) translates to For God and Country.‘Deo et Patriæ’ has been the guiding slogan of the university since its foundation, and the strength and fervor of that slogan were amply demonstrated during the dark years of the War, when students and professors marched shoulder to shoulder in the grim chaos of Flanders.”
Saskatoon Star Phoenix [Saskatoon Daily Star] July 15, 1926.

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN HONOUR ROLL ADDENDUM
Andrew Melville Anderson
Albert F. Bailey
Louis Brehaut 28th Bn.
John Rich Bunn Can. Army Med. Corps.
Harry Ray Contelon 1st Univ. Co., PPCLI,D
William Kenneth Forbes
J.W. French R.A.F.
General Middleton Grant 1st Depot Bn.
David Robert Green 1st Depot Bn., R.F.C.
William James Hall
William Cameron MacIntosh 28th Bn., 65th Overseas BN.
Kenneth McKenzie 196th Bn.
Vernon Ulysses Miner
Andrew Ernest Stewart
Robert Stewart 65th Bn, 72nd Bn, Wounded.
George Moir Weir
John McIntyre White Y.M.C.A. 46th Bn
Paul Peter Wiklund 44th Bn., Killed

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Adamson, Julia. Archives ~Resources National, Provincial, City, and University archives. Saskatchewan Gen Web. April 10, 2014. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia. Libraries Resources Saskatchewan Gen Web. April 10, 2014. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia. War and Military resources Saskatchewan Gen Web. April 10, 2014. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia Millions of Archival Newspaper Pages set to go online Saskatchewan Gen Web E~Magazine May 27, 2014. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia. Michelle Lang. Canadian Journalist. Jan. 31, 1975-Dec 30, 2009. Afghanistan Casualty. Saskatchewan Gen Web E~Magazine November 11, 2012. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia. Naval Monument honours Royal Canadian Navy prairie seamen and RCN ships. H.M.C.S. Regina (K234) and H.M.C.S. Weyburn (K 173) Saskatchewan Gen Web E~Magazine September 25, 2013. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia. Montgomery Place Est. in 1946 by Our War Veterans. Saskatchewan Gen Web E~Magazine. October 9, 2013. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson Julia. H.W. Balfour’s Truly Impressive Career. Recognized for Outstanding Civic Service and Meritorious Military Achievement. Saskatchewan Gen Web E~Magazine April 7, 2013 Date accessed August 7,2014.

Barnhart, Gordon. Oliver, Edmund H. (1882–1935) Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan. Canadian Plains Research Center. University of Regina. 2006. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Biber, Francois. Saskatoon Great War Memorial last of its kind in Canada. What began in 1923 remaing and has grown to more than 1,200 memorials CJME news. August 6, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Brian Gable. Wikipedia the free encyclopedia. July 30, 2013. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Brian Gable Editorial Cartoonist Bio. The Globe and Mail. June 3, 2009. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Brian Gable on Facebook Date accessed August 7, 2014.

[1] Charlton, Jonathan. Great War shaped Saskatoon and U of S The Saskatoon Star Phoenix. Page A5. Thursday July 31, 2014.

Coggins, Jack. A Chaplain’s War. Edmund Henry Oliver and the University of Vimy Ridge, 1916-1919 (pdf) Univeristy of Saskatchewan Library Archives. History Department Essays 2004. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Dawson, Anna-Lilja. The U of S held strong through the World Wars. The Sheaf. November 7, 2013. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

England declares war on Germany The Guardian. August 5, 1914. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Eric Story on Facebook Eric Story (The_RealEAS) on Twitter Date accessed August 7,2014.

Ferguson, Mark. The University of Saskatchewan will rename the historic College Building to the Peter MacKinnon Building to honour the outgoing U of S President. University of Saskatchewan News. June 14, 2012. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Gable, Brian 1949- Something about the author, Scholarly Magazines, Encyclopedia.com. January 2009. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Globe and Mail on Twitter (#globeandmail) ‘The war to end all wars’: Today’s editorial cartoon by Brian Gable. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Great War Commemoration Committee on Facebook. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Great War Commomoration Committee on Twitter (#GWCP306) Date accessed August 7,2014.

Halliwell, J. Joseph Boyden. The Agenda with Steve Paikin. Video. Joseph Boyden: First Nations and the First World War July 31, 2014. Author Joseph Boyden discusses the important role Aboriginals played in the First World War, and the real-life Ojibwe soldier that inspired his novel “Three Day Road.”2014. The Ontario Educational Communications Authority (TVO) Date accessed August 7,2014.

Harvey, Alban.
Joseph Boyden The Canadian Encyclopedia. Aboriginal Peoples. March 6, 2014. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Hayden, Michael. Why Are All Those Names on the Wall? The University of Saskatchewan and World War I. Saskatchewan History 58, no. 2 (2006): 4.14.

Higher Education. The University of Saskatchewan: The Start Saskatchewan News Index. Top News Stories. University of Saskatchewan Library. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Joseph Boyden. Wikipedia The free encyclopedia. March 7, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Lacey, Dana. Documents show Harper;s extreme political control The Canadian Journalism Project. June 8, 2010. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Long-lost names added to U of S War Memorial. 18 names will be added to the Roll of Honor. August 6, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Mattern, Ashleigh. Alumnus Profile: Brian Gable, editorial cartoonist for the Globe and Mail. Centennial Committee. April 16, 2012. The Sheaf, One Hundred Years.Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Nurse, Donna Bailey. Joseph Boyden Author Profile. Way of the Warrior. Joseph Boyden brings new voice to First World War epic. Quill and Quire, Canada’s magazine of Book News and Reviews. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Pitsula, James M. Manly Heroes: The University of Saskatchewan and the First World War. In Paul Stortz and E. Lisa Panayotidis, eds., Cultures, Communities, and Conflict: Histories of Canadian Universities and War. University of Toronto Press, 2012.

Preston, Richard. First World War centenary: how the events of August 1, 1914 unfolded. Telegraph. August 1, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014

Preston, Richard. First World War centenary: how the events of August 2, 1914 unfolded. Telegraph. August 2, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014

Preston, Richard. First World War centenary: how the events of August 3, 1914 unfolded. Telegraph. August 3, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014

Preston, Richard. First World War centenary: how the events of August 4, 1914 unfolded. Telegraph. August 4, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014

Remember Us Great War Commemoration project begins with plaque unveiling. Facebook.
Remember Us. University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Project begins with plaque unveiling University of Saskatchewan News. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Sibbald, Kirk. Cartoons and Calculus. Green and White. FAll 2010. Features. University of Saskatchewan. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Stoon Great War on twitter (#StoonGreatWar) Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Story, Eric. Saskatchewan History online. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Streck, Aaron. Eighteen alumni names complete U of S commemoration from WWI Global News. Shaw Media Inc. August 7, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Tipalady, Thomas. The Soul of the Soldier Sketches from the Western Battle-Front Fleming H. Revell Company. New York. 1918. Project Gutenberg.org Ebook #46323 Produced by Al Haines. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

University remembers those who served in First World War. CTV news. August 7, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

University of Saskatchewan Great War on Twitter (#usaskGW) Date accessed August 7, 2014.

University of Saskatchewan honours students, faculty and staff who fought in WWI August 7, 2014. University of SAskatchewan News. August 7, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Three Day Road [This novel written by Joseph Boyden follows the journey of two young Cree men, Xavier and Elijah, who volunteer for that war and become snipers during World War I] Wikipedia the free encyclopedia. August 2, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Waiser, Bill. Opinion: Let’s protect future census data. Edmonton Journal Reprinted by the Ottawa Citizen. May 26, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

World War I Campus History. University of Saskatchewan. University Library. University Archives and Special Collections. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

  • Database at World War I:
  • Killed, died or wounded
  • U of S affiliation at enlistment
  • Batallion/unit at enlistment
  • Batallion/unit – all assignments
  • U of S College
  • Date of death
  • Decoration type
  • Rank

 

World War one Centenary on Twitter. (#wwicentenary) Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Stewart, Les. Why won’t this federal government support our invisibly wounded soldiers? Cartoon from the Globe and Mail, re posted by the Springwater Park Citizen’s Coalition, a sustainbale business plan for Springwater Provincial Park in Midhurst, Ontario. December 20, 2013. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

WWI Canada Centennial Commemoration on facebook Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Notice and Disclaimer:

The purpose of the information on this site is to assist genealogists, historians and other interested parties in locating information regarding the World War One Centenary Celebrations. Please e-mail the author at saskgenweb@yahoo.com if you have any further updates or additions. Thank you.

To cite this article:

World War One Remembered at the University of Saskatchewan . Saskatchewan Gen Web. Rootsweb. Ancestry.com . Retrieved .

E-mail saskgenweb@yahoo.com

 

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Iceland to Saskatchewan

11 Jul

Iceland to Saskatchewan

Icelandic migration to Canada, New Iceland Manitoba Lake Region, two settlements in southeast Saskatchewan Thingvalla and Churchbridge areas and Foam Lake settlement

Adapted from by Wikimedia commons File:Canada (orthographic projection).svg CC-BY-3.0 by Aquarius.geomar.de

…..From their homes in Iceland, via ferry to Scotland, then by way of steamer across the vast Pacific Ocean reaching the prairies by rail, such was the path taken by the Western Icelanders who established themselves in New Iceland along the shores of the great Manitoba lakes in 1875. Six years later, the settlement expanded into the North West Territories establishing Thingvalla and Logberg. This area expanded to the south, creating Vesturbyggd or or the “Western Settlement” also called the Concordia district (near Churchbridge). Around 1887, Vatnsdalur the “Water Valley” District around Vallar and Hólar (now known as Tantallon) received Icelandic migrants. Five years later Icelanders also made homes around the Quill Lakes, Fishing Lake and Foam Lake which became known as Vatnabyyður or Vatnabyggd “Lakes Settlement.” During this early settlement era, these ethnic bloc settlements were part of the District of Assiniboia, North West Territories. It wasn’t until 1905 that the province of Saskatchewan was incorporated in Canada.

Komdu sæl og blessuö.
Hello and Blessings.

…..“Rocked in their infant days to the tunes of the old sagas, Canada’s Icelanders have provided names for commemoration in the sagas yet to be written in the persons of such historic figures as Vilhjalmur Stefansson, Minister of public works in the Norris Administration; Wilhelm Paulson, Member of the Legislative Assembly (MLA); Bryan Bjarnason, MLA; Bill Sveinson, MLA; Raymond Thorsteinsson, geologist; Stephan G. Stephansson, poet; Rev. Jon Bjarnason, Founder of the Icelandic Lutheran Synod of North America and many famous office holders.”1 such as Leo Kristjanson, Ph.D. president of the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) 1980-1989, Laurel Johannesson, artist; (Hans) Jakob Jónsson, Lutheran Minister, and Thorbergur Thorvaldson M.Sc., PhD. head of the U of S Department of Chemistry. “To maintain their common ideals an association was formed in 1919 known as the Icelandic National League of North America embracing both sides of the line on the same principals as the Sons of England and Caledonian Society.”1


Af godu upphafi vonast godur endir.

Translation: A good beginning makes a good ending.
~European proverb.

…..According to Joan Eyolfson Cadham, “the Icelandic Eddas, prose and poetry were preserved orally until they were written down during the 13th century…. Gudmundur Andri Thorsson, an Icelandic author columnist and editor, explained that, in Icelandic, ‘the old meaning of the word edda is langamma – great grandmother ..somewhere deep inside we hear the voices of our great-grandmothers – our Eddas – who knew all the stories and sometimes drew us into the strange and beautiful world of storytelling.’ “2 These tales tell of the “ancient Icelandic strength, courage and determination that defied everything, even the elements and death itself.6

“As the generations passed, the Icelanders sent their children off to university–an unattainable dream in the Old Country–where they became mostly lawyers, judges, teachers, and journalists, sometimes of great distinction. ” ~Bill Holm

It is the perseverance, hard work and the ingenuity of its people in harnessing their resources that have made Iceland a modern and progressive society, and a well-respeced member of the international community.” Jón Jónsson, Consul of Iceland in Saskatchewan at the 13th annual Vatnabyggö Club þorrabloót, winter festival, ” It is also a community that is proud of and determined to preserve its literary, artistic, and cultural heritage.”#

 

…..The Icelanders came to Canada in family groups mainly organized by their own personal initiative following the advice of friends, relatives or immigration agents who had traveled to the new country before them. Truly, the ethnic network of Saskatchewan has been truly enriched by this infusion of Icelandic roots and culture.


Ég skildi, að orð er á Íslandi til um allt, sem er hugsað á jorðu.

I understood, that a word in Iceland exists, covering every thought on Earth

~Einar Benediktsson.

…To read more…Iceland to Saskatchewan Source Page, bibliography, maps, homestead records, and resources.

The southern aspect of the province of Saskatchewan showing the Icelandic Settlements
Historic Railway Maps

Click on map for larger size.

South Eastern Saskatchewan
Thingvalla – Lögberg (1886)
Vatnsdalur, Vesturbyggd “Western Settlement” or the Concordia District
“Water Valley” the District around Vallar – Hólar (now known as Tantallon) (1887)
South Eastern Icelandic Colonies South Eastern Saskatchewan Thingvalla - Lögberg (1886) Vatnsdalur, Vesturbyggd 'Western Settlement' or the Concordia District, 'Water Valley' the District around Vallar - Hólar (now known as Tantallon) (1887)
Settlement
School Districts South Eastern Icelandic Colonies South Eastern Saskatchewan Thingvalla - Lögberg (1886) Vatnsdalur, Vesturbyggd 'Western Settlement' or the Concordia District, 'Water Valley' the District around Vallar - Hólar (now known as Tantallon) (1887)
School Districts
East Central Saskatchewan
Vatnabyyður or Vatnabyggd “Lakes Settlement” (1891)
East Central Saskatchewan Vatnabyyður or Vatnabyggd 'Lakes Settlement
Settlement
East Central Saskatchewan Vatnabyyður or Vatnabyggd 'Lakes Settlement School Districts
School Districts

…To read more…Iceland to Saskatchewan Source Page, bibliography, maps, homestead records, and resources.

D-Day, June 6, 1944, 70th Anniversary Commemoration

27 May

D-Day, June 6, 1944, 70th Anniversary Commemoration
Are you ready for a trip to France?

Adapted from Library and Archives Canada images on Flickr. Set of images:D-Day

On June 6, 1944 – D-Day, the day of the Normandy Landings ~ Western Allied effort to liberate mainland Europe from Nazi occupation during World War II
Adapted from Library and Archives Canada images on Flickr. Set of images:D-Day

The Canadian Government has organised ceremonies in Canada and in France to honour those who served in World War II. This occasion commemorates the 70th anniversary of D-Day (June 6, 1944) and the Battle of Normandy.

Veterans from all nations and Canadians are all invited to attend the ceremonies. Provinces across the nation will additionally have ceremonies demarking the occasion. Financial assistance from Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) is available to help Veterans attend the overseas events in France.

Postcards for Peace is one method for youth to become involved in remembering the sacrifices made in times of war or in active service. Although Veteran’s Affairs suggests other ways to remember, such as inviting a Veteran or Canadian Armed Forces as a guest speaker to a classroom or to a community event, or to write stories and poems about remembrance for a few of the ideas they offer as ways to remember. Valentine’s for Vets encourages hand made valentines for our Canadian Veterans.

According to A Historical Atlas of Canada from Canada there were 22,817 army fatalities, 2,019 navy casualties and 17,101 casualties from the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) who had served in World War II. The Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial lists 4,952 who paid the supreme sacrifice from Saskatchewan or 11.8% of the World War II Canadian contingent.

The 1952-53 Canada Year Book reports that Saskatchewan as a province had a population of 895,992 in 1941 and 831,728 in 1951, whereas the nation of Canada had a total population of 11,596,655 in 1941 and 14,009,429 in 1951. Saskatchewan represented 7.7% of the Canadian population in 1941, and 5.9% of the population in 1951.

The strategy and planning that went into D-day and the landings in Normandy resulted in the vitally strategic capture of Caen on July 9. According to the CBC, “For Canada, 14,000 soldiers were to land on the beaches; another 450 were to drop behind enemy lines by parachute or glider. The Royal Canadian Navy supplied ships and about 10,000 sailors.” Counting the casualties from the D-Day invasion from all allied forces has been estimated at 10,000 dead and wounded. Veterans Affairs reports that about three hundred and forty Canadians were killed on D-Day on Juno Beach alone. Over 5,000 paid the supreme sacrifice.

Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial presents a Roll of Honour for those from Saskatchewan who paid the ultimate sacrifice during World War II.


“Lest We Forget

 

They shall gow not old, as we that are left grow old, age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, we will remember them.

We will remember them

Lord God of Hosts

Be with us yet,

Lest we forget,

Lest we forget.”

Author Julia Adamson

For more information:

1952-53 Canada Year Book Statistics Canada. 2009-06-09. Date accessed May 26, 2014.

Adamson, Julia Saskatchewan Gen Web – Military Resources. Date Accessed May 26, 2014.

Barry, Bill. Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial Date accessed May 26, 2014.
Canada and the Second World War. Canada at D-Day. Canadian War Museum. Canadian Museum of History. Government of Canada. Date accessed May 26, 2014.

CBC D-day The Allied Invasion of Normandy. june 4, 2009.

Kerr, D.G.G., editor. Historical Atlas of Canada. Canadian Historical Associations Committee on a Historical Atlas of Canada. 1960. Thomas Nelson and Sons (Canada) ltd. Library of Congress catalog card number 60-9189.

Library and Archives Canada images on Flickr. Set of images: D-Day

Veterans Affairs Canada >> Remembrance >>
History >>
The Second World War >>
D-Day and the Battle of Normandy

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