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Centenary Cemetery

11 Nov Poppies for Remembrance Day

Centenary Cemetery
mind not the weeper or the prayer,
all those who have the eyes to see,

The moon gives you light,
  And the bugles and drums, the night

To the Judge of Right and Wrong
Our purpose and our power belong,

with uncomprehending eyes
laid down immediate and wise;

Where now the Mother, comfort me?
Where Art Thou Father, can't you see?

Gather round the Centenary Cemetery over there
Old and young with hymn and prayer
Poppies for Remembrance Day

Poppy

Blow out, you bugles, over lads Dead!
These laid the world away; poured out the red
     What passing-bells for these who die as cattle?
        Only the stuttering rifles' rapid rattle

But yesterday amid glory and the prize,
          One strove to quiet the other's cries,

rules consider wise,
See whence the tear-filled eyes

O Best beloved can you see battle-corpses, myriads of them,
          And the white skeletons of young men, who saw them?

The banners play, the bugles call,
The air is blue and prodigal.

To death, because they never lived: but I
Have lived indeed, and so—(yet one more kiss)—can die!

No funerary for them; no prayers nor bells,
Just shrill, demented choirs of wailing shells;

with staring sightless eyes,
Hear around the many sighs

We see and hold the good—
For Freedom’s brotherhood.

Gather round the Centenary Cemetery over there
Citizen and Child with hymn and prayer

A steady rain, dark and thick
Now feel the stir of despair quick

My comrade’s eyes
holy glimmers of goodbyes.

So now the poppy in fields doth bloom’
For the day all fill’d with gloom,

Clearing your minds of all estranging blindness
Speak now of Freedom, Honour and Lovingkindness.

Upon sightless staring eyes
soft short broken sighs,

Only his collar with his honourable mark
Mankind’s best hope? Laid out this night in solitary dark

While man has power to perish and be free—
Men perished for their dream of Liberty

Here sit the haggard men that speak no word,
No voice of fellowship or strife is heard

The British War Medal World War I.

Medal.

The body now denies
To Sleep return, little eyes

Nary it shines in lurid light,
Tales of  terrors, and the  blight,

Naught broken save this body, lost but breath;
And the worst friend and enemy is but Death.

They shall feel earth enwrapt in silence deep;
Men pass the grave, and say, “‘Twere well to sleep,

The peace of death.
The lifeless breath

Before our eyes
Hear still the cries

upon earth’s peaceful breast
Each laid him down to rest,

Gather round the Centenary Cemetery over there
Generations ever after with hymn and prayer

The day is past and the battle doth cease;
And hearts rest, eventide brings peace

Now speak of the peace that comes after strife,
The calm that follows the battle-filled life —

Now come the prayers and the bell
To honour them as they fell

Resound in peace and glory long
Sing out no more the bugle song

To ancestors you must see
Will you ever remember me?

So here I pray thee lay me not
to Rest in no memory and Die for naught.

Where’s that poppy on your collar?
Stand up now for peace, shout and holler

Poppies for Remembrance Day

Poppies

Genealogy Hints and Tips: During the Centennial years following World War I (1914-1918), Search for the ancestor fallen. The tragedy has come to light, and diaries, battalions, battles, records, medals, reports, images, are coming online. From Vimy in the Classroom, Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial, Library and Archives images online at Fickr. The internet abounds remembering, honouring and paying tribute to those who fell in the Great War.  Have you, yourself, come to know your ancestor of the Great War?

Read more:

 In Flanders Fields and Other Poems With an Essay in Character, by Sir Andrew Macphail Author: John McCrae

Drum Taps Author: Walt Whitman

A Treasury of War Poetry British and American Poems of the World War 1914-1917
Auhor: Edited, with Introduction and Notes, by George Herbert Clarke

1914 and other poems. Author Rupert Brooke

Battle-Pieces and Aspects of the War Author: Herman Melville

Dramatic Romances Author: Robert Browning

Poems Author: Wilfred Owen

Little known 1918 battle: Battle of Iwuy

25 Oct

Cimetiè re Iwuy carré militaire. Iwuy Military Cemetery
Niagra Cemetery, Iwuy Military Cemetery.

Little known 1918 battle: Battle of Iwuy

 

 

Français
English

 

A very worthwhile project has been initiated in the city of Iwuy (population 3,232), department Nord, district of Cambrai (region Nord-Pas-de-Calais), France. Michel Lespagnol, resident of the village hopes to pay tribute to all the people who participated in a little known 1918 battle that freed the village on the anniversary date of “The Battle of Iwuy.” Lespagnol, retired now from the Railways, has a love of history becoming an amateur local historian of the area, and is requested by the teachers to help explain the great sacrifices undertaken by military personnel. With supporting documents and field trips, the classroom of youngsters are enriched by the knowledge imparted to them about the war effort. Lespagnol feels deeply about the great time lapse between current generations and the era of the “war to end all wars” and worries that after the interest re-kindled by the 100th anniversary of armistice that the youngest will forget these hard times too quickly.

Now a brief introduction to the Battle of Iwuy. “Combining elements of all-arms fighting, the last Canadian cavalry charge, and the only engagement of Canadian troops with German tanks during the First World War. Mike McNorgan’s analysis [in the book, More Fighting for Canada: Five Battles 1760-1944] of the 1918 Battle of Iwuy is one of the most interesting and original of the essays in More Fighting for Canada by virtue of the fact that almost no one has ever heard of the action. “1

“The 21 st Canadian Battalion will cross the Canal de L’Escaut over bridge …[location] at
0800 hours this date, and occupy billets in ESCAUDOEUVRES.”Full text of “21st Infantry Battalion War Diary (1915-1919)” at Archive.org

October 9, 1918 the Canadian Light Horse (CLH) had crossed the Canal de l’Escaut to seize the high ground northwest of Naves. Their attack was halted with heavy losses, by concentrated machine gun fire coming from Naves and nearby Iwuy.”[5]

October 10, 1918 was a rainy, misty day. The “A” and “B” Companies and the 19th Battalion went ahead for the attack on the town of Naves establishing a position about 8:30 in the morning. “In the afternoon the cavalry came up to advance on the next ridge. They went over us about 2:00 or 3:00 in the afternoon. They had to go down a hill and up another. A creek [the River Erclin] ran between them and the Germans, who were on the other side in trenches on the hill. The cavalry went forward, the horses ringing wet (with sweat). …It is a pretty sight as they dashed down the hill and over the creek …then the Germans opened up on them. It was a shame. They could not help but hit them with machine guns. All the men out of seventy five or so went down but one, and he finally went. But the horses were not all killed. That attack was a failure…The charge on October 10 cost the regiment seventy-one animals, of which sixty-six were killed. The losses among the men were considerably lighter, five killed and seventeen wounded.”[5]

The 21 st Battalion War Diary mentions that on October 11th the Unit commanders met at 0100 hours to arrange the operation and details. The 20th Canadian Battalion was readied in the rear of the 21st Canadian Battalion, and they were ready to proceed at 0900 hours. The German troops shelled the area with H.E. and Gas from 05:30 hours onward. At 0900 hours, the 146th Brigade commenced to the the right of the 21st Canadian Battalion. Especially during the first hour of this advance on the high ground of Avesnes-Le-Sec many casualties were sustained as the Germans opened fire with machine guns. “Fifty percent of our Officers, N.C.O.s and Lewis Gunners became casualties during the first half hour of the action.” 21st Battalion

“The 4 th Canadian Infantry Brigade will continue the attack tomorrow, 11 th October, at
0900 hours, with the object of capturing AVESNES-le-SEC and move on to NOVELLES, and
attempt to make good crossing over River ERCLIN.
Full text of “21st Infantry Battalion War Diary (1915-1919)”

The action proceeded promptly at 0900 hours with the 146th Brigade on the right of the 21st Canadian Battalion. As the advance continued on the high ground south-west of Avesnes-Le-Sec and suffered many casualties from German machine gun fire. The enemy then brought out tanks as a counter measure. The Canadians withdrew to re-organize. 21 st Battalion war diary source

On October 11, 1918, the German counterattack involved military tanks. As the allies advanced, they were met by a bombardment of shells, and approaching tanks. After a reconnoiter by the military officers, the infantry was on task again. “Our officers began to figure it out and they yelled “come on Canadians.” We went and all the Imperials as well, we were all mixed up, and the rally was followed all along the line. It was in the open and there were thousands of men. The Germans were thick too. They had two tanks on our front. Great big square tanks. We went on to meet them and about halfways several of the tanks were shot by bullets. By now, the Germans had stopped and were starting to go back.”[5] In the aftermath, the reports differ as to the number of tanks, ranging from two to half a dozen tanks at this attack.

Deward Barnes states in his book, “Journal of Deward Barnes, Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1916-1919” that “this episode is also peculiar because it saw an officer of the British Empire employing a captured, German-made rifle to help drive off a German attack consisting mainly of captured, British-made tanks?” Barnes states that about one hundred abandoned and damaged British tanks had been re-furbished by the Germans as only about twenty German-made tanks had been deployed.

Now the 20th Canadian Battalion, was immediately after the 21st Canadian Battalion, and the 20th was the left attacking flank. After the withdrawal, the advance continued onwards at 1530 hours on October 11th. Now the 6th Canadian Infantry Brigade was fighting on the left. 21 st Battalion war diary source

As can be seen in the Military Cross Citation for Captain Baxter, “He [Baxter] pushed forward with his company, and having use of all his Lewis guns and three captured machine guns, was able to force the tanks to retire, thereby enabling the position to be held, and the advance to continue later.” source- Battling Tanks at Iwuy: The last German use of tanks in World War 1

“Thirteen Officers of those who went forward with the Battalion became casualties on October 10th – 11th.” Highest honours were bestowed. source 21 st Battalion war diary source

[October 11th/12th.] “Our casualties during the advance of the day were: Officers killed, 3; died of wounds, 1; wounded, 6; wounded at duty, 2; Gassed 1; Other Rankes, killed 39; wounded 272; Missing 2.” 21 st Battalion war diary source

Stephanie Potter in her thesis states, ” Cavalry was responsible for passing through the infantry line once objectives had been captured, and clearing the area of enemy troops while keeping pressure on the enemy retreat . In pursuit, speed was of the utmost importance to keep the enemy from reforming and reinforcing their lines and launching a counterattack. Cavalry was of vital importance in this particular role due to its superior mobility. Mounted troops were able to advance quickly, charge and disperse the enemy, and could efficiently round up small enemy parties or speed up their retreat.” However, as cavalry advanced into open country, enemy fire consistently came from covered locations such as woods, villages, and houses, leaving cavalry vulnerable and hard pressed to put enemy guns out of action. Thus machine gun support was necessary to counteract enemy fire, form defensive flanks and pivots for the cavalry to manoeuvre from and retain mobility, consolidate captured ground, and to fire upon the retreating enemy.”

Conversly, Potter states that tanks “were not designed to traverse trenches, but to advance across open country without being vulnerable to enemy fire.” Tanks had “limited reliability and slow rate of advance.” On observation tanks “were less vulnerable to machine gun fire than cavalrymen, but they could not sustain artillery fire…. Concentrated machine gun fire was capable of putting any tank out of action.” “Armoured vehicles also provided…a larger target, and lacked the cavalry’s mobility to escape …quickly….The enemy of the tank is the gun. In 1918 tanks were also hampered by limited manoeuvarability. It was understood that all tanks were incapable of manoeuvring in confined spaces, such as woods and villages. ….tanks could not perform their own reconnaissance due to poor visibility [from within the vehicle] and difficult communication between vehicles with no radios. ”

It is truly wonderful that Lespagnol is still in contact with the “family of George Hambley, one of the riders who wrote the last charge in his diary.” Additionally, Lespagnol states that “there is a small cemetery with 200 tombs of soldiers of the great war” at Niagara Cemetery, Nord, France.

Tank à Iwuy en 1918

Tank à Iwuy en 1918. A Tank at Iwuy in 1918.

According to Wikipedia, at Iwuy, there are two cemeteries which are managed by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission. “The Communal Cemetery Iwuy (Iwuy Communal Cemetery) was enlarged by German troops during their occupation of the territory. This extension was granted by the municipality after the Armistice and the graves of German and French soldiers were moved to other cemeteries. The British cemetery was established by the 51st (Highland) Division in October 1918. The cemetery contains more than 100 graves of soldiers who died in 1914-1918 and 1939-1945
Niagara Cemetery was established in October 1918 during the occupation of the village by British troops. It contains more than 200 graves of victims of the First World War, with a few unidentified ”

Niagara Cemetery inside

Cimetière Niagara intérieur. Niagara Cemetery inside

Approximately 26 soldiers with ties to Saskatchewan are buried at the Niagara Cemetery. One of whom was Métis Canadian Soldier, Charles Daniels Service No. 718433, born March 18, 1896 to John and Maria Daniels. Lespagnol was interested in finding out “who were the parents of this soldier, just to know the 2 nationalities just to show to the youngest that this was the concern of all the nations to put a end to this dramatic war.” On the 1901 census his father, John Daniels (English) was born in Manitoba August 1855 and his mother Maria Daniels (Cree) was born 1871, in the North West Territories. They had seven children, Charles was the fourth child born in South Battleford, North West Territories. Charles enlisted twice, on February 5, 1916 he provided William Daniels of Frog Lake, Alberta, his brother, as the next of kin the next time he enlisted ~October 26, 1916 ~ he gave his sister Emma Martel of South Battleford as his next of kin. When Charles first enlisted he stated that he was a labourer at Onion Lake, and had previously served with the 22 Light Horse, Saskatchewan. He served six months over seas with the 107th over seas Battalion, C.E.F. in 1916 following his first WWI attestation. On his second enlistment papers, he was living in Saskatoon, and gave his occupation as farmer. He gave the supreme sacrifice October 11, 1918, while serving with the 28th Battalion.Charles had three younger siblings, Marianne Edward, and Dorothy. William was the eldest in the family then Emma and Natelline (Vatteline) nickname Lena.

It is very gratifying that Lespagnol is willing and enthusiastic to share his passionate study of history in respect to the Battle of Iwuy, this obscure World War I battle whose details are fascinating and slipping away from the lives of present day society. Lespagnol is able to take the individual soldier memorialized on the tombstones of the Niagara cemetery, and place them into their larger context, enabling the students to understand the era, the memories and sacrifices undertaken by the soldiers. The Battle of Iwuy which took place in October 1918, may seem remote, perhaps not as inaccessible as the Battle of Waterloo which also affected the villagers of Iwuy, however, Lespagnol brings the past into the present, helping the youngsters perceive history with a new perspective. Lespagnol’s experience and knowledge enable the groups of students come to grips with a wonderment of “how did things come to be this way?”

Iwuy Niagara cemetery commons

Cimetière Niagara. Niagara Cemetery Author Camster CC 3.0

 

In remembering those who gave their lives during the Great War students and educators are honouring the past during the World War One centennary. Lespagnol says that it is of note that “all the nations [came together] to put a end to this dramatic war” On the 16th and 19th of November, 2015, Michel Lespagnol will lead 2 groups of students to the Niagara cemetery to explain to them about the Battle of Iwuy” at the very place where it took place. Here they will receive a more comprehensive understanding of the impact World War I had globally. By exploring the histories of those memorialized at Niagara Cemetery, the outing will show the international impact of the war, and how it involved the greater majority of countries at that time. Lespagnol hopes the next generation will remember the great sacrifices made in the “war to end all wars”. The soldier’s stories will thusly be recalled to mind, and the lessons from the Battle of Iwuy are learned through the soldier’s voices. Lespagnol, hopes to make a link, a connection with the new generation, “a duty of memory not to forget the sacrifices of the allied who freed us from the invaders.” Students will experience history of those brave men, the terrible losses experienced by families and counties, and the global impact of World War One. Lespagnol’s “aim aim is to pay tribute to all the people who participated to free our village at the anniversary date of “The Battle of Iwuy.”

Author Julia Adamson.
If you have further information about the Battle of Iwuy, know of a source of information, the global involvement of soldiers or biography of those who served from Saskatchewan at the Battle of Iwuy, please e-mail Julia Adamson, Saskatchewan and Michel Lespagnol, Iwuy, France. Thank you.

THE DEAD

Blow out, you bugles, over the rich Dead!
There’s none of these so lonely and poor of old,
But, dying, has made us rarer gifts than gold.
These laid the world away;
poured out the red Sweet wine of youth;

gave up the years to be Of work and joy,
and that unhoped serene,

That men call age;

and those who would have been,
Their sons, they gave, their immortality.

Blow, bugles, blow!
They brought us,
for our dearth, Holiness, lacked so long, and Love, and Pain.

Honour has come back, as a king, to earth,
And paid his subjects with a royal wage;
And Nobleness walks in our ways again;
And we have come into our heritage.Rupert Brooke

 

Niagara cemetery

Niagara cimetière Niagara cemetery

H
o
u
s
eFamily
or
House-
holdName of each person in family or household on 31st March, 1901.Sex.Relationship
to head of
family or
household.Single,
married,
widowed or
divorced.Month and date of birth.Year of birth.Age at last birthday.Country or place of birth
(If in Canada specify Province or Territory, and add “r” or “u” for rural or urgan as the case may be)Racial or Tribal originReligionTradeMother Tongue (if Spoken)comments

1901 CENSUS for Charles Daniels Family



25 42 Daniels John M Head M Aug 1855 45 Man English Church of England Employed 12 months in other occupation than trade in factory or home. 400 Extra earnings (From other than chief occupation or trade) Mother tongue English is crossed out and Cree written in

26 42 Daniels Marie F Wife M 1871 30 NWT Cree Mother tongue if spoken is Cree

27 42 Daniels William M Son S Feb 18 1887 14 English Mother tongue if spoken is Cree Can read, write and speak English

28 42 Daniels Emma F Daughter S Sep 1889 11

29 42 Daniels Natelline F Daughter S Nov 20 1891 9

30 42 Daniels Charles M Son S Mar 19 1895 6 0* “

31 42 Daniels Marianne F Daughter S Mar 17 1898 3

    1901 Census of Canada Page Information

 


 

 

L
i
n
e
#No. of
family in
order of
visitationName of each person in family.Relation to head of family.Sex.Married,
single,
widowed or
divorced.Age.Country or Place of Birth

1906 CENSUS for Charles Daniels Family



15 3 Daniels John Head M M 60 Man

16 Daniels Mary Wife F M 36 Sask

17 Daniels William Son M S 19 Sask

18 Daniels Eunice ? Daughter F S 18 Sask

19 Daniels Lena Daughter F S 16 Sask

20 Daniels Charles Son M S 11 Sask

21 Daniels Mary Ann Daughter F S 9 Sask

22 Daniels Edward Son M S 3 Sask

23 Bull ? Solomon Boarder M S 19 Sask

1906 Census Page Data
District: SK Saskatchewan District (#16)
Subdistrict: 33 (Town of Battleford) Page 22

Images are from the National Archives Web Site
Details: Schedule 1 Microfilm T-18360
Source : Automated Genealogy


 

 

H
o
u
s
eFamily
or
House-
holdName of each person in family or household on 31st March, 1901.Sex.Relationship
to head of
family or
household.Single,
married,
widowed or
divorced.Month and date of birth.Year of birth.Age at last birthday.Country or place of birth
(If in Canada specify Province or Territory)

1911 CENSUS for Charles Daniels Family



36 19 Daniels John M Head M Apr 1850 60 Sask

37 19 Daniels Mary F Wife M Mar 1865 56 N.W.T

38 19 Daniels William M Son S Jan 1886 25 N.W.T

39 19 Daniels Charlie M Son S Mar 1894 17 N.W.T

40 19 Daniels Edward M Son S Apr 1902 9 N.W.T

41 19 Daniels Dorothy F Daughter S Mar 1911 03-Dec N.W.T

Note: Saskatchewan became a province in 1905, before this, the births were recorded in the area known as the North-West Territories (NWT). Territorial evolution of Canada Atlas of Saskatchewan Boundary Evolution

Source Automated Genealogy
/ 1911 / Saskatchewan / Battleford / 47 Battleford / page 3

National Archives


 

 

Lieut. Rich. Hocken is killed in action. Son of Former Mayor of Toronto - Lieut. G.E. Mills Reported in Wounded List. Toronto Star, Oct. 16, 1918

 

Lieut. Rich. Hocken is killed in action.
Son of Former Mayor of Toronto
– Lieut. G.E. Mills Reported in Wounded List.
Toronto Star, Oct. 16, 1918

 

PHOTO RICHARD HOCKEN

Richard Hocken

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

20th Battalion Central Ontario, CEF. Wikipedia

Canadian Expeditionary Force: Central Ontario Regiment FirstWorldWar.com A multimedia hsitory of world war one. 20th Battalion.

21st Battalion (Eastern Ontario), CEF Wikipedia.

21st Battalion, Nominal Rolls 1915 and 1918 Canadian Expeditionary Force. Minister of Militia and Defence.
Year 1915.

21st Battalion History PWOR. The Princess of Wales Own Regiment.

The 21st Battalion CEF

21st Battalion CEF Discussion Group Yahoo Groups.

21st Battalion (Eastern Ontario) CEF Canadian Expeditionary Force Biographies written by Al Lloyd

Elie Barry **
Alfred Stanley Brown ***
Russell Brown
Roy A Burns
William E. Campbell
James Thomas Carroll
Gidreau (aka Gideon) Chartrand *
Richard A Clarke
George Granville Cobbledick
Thomas Sylvester Connaghan
Matthew Craig
Russell Crarey
Alexander DeMarsh
Roy Dickinson
Hugh Whitmore Dodson
William Harold Edmiston
William Forbes Ferrier
Pte James Foley
Sebra Hall
Pte William Hartell
Frederick William Heath *
Pte Findlay Henderson
Pte William Henderson
Pte James S Heyworth
Pte Mortie Hodge
Pte Harry Hopkinson
Pte Michael Kaley
Pte Montague EM Kemp
Pte Thomas Kenny
L/Sgt Alexander T King
Pte Irwin P Lehman
Ferdinand Leon
Pte Joseph Levert
John Robert Crawford MacPherson
James Mansfield
John Roy McBride
Charles Howard McInnis
David A McKenzie
Ian Ross McKenzie
Pte William J Newnham
James Leo O’Connor
Henry John Parkins
Pte Patrick Philban
Francis William Porter
Pte George A Ryan
Lt Alexander M Scott
Pte Francis Silver
Pte Herbert L Simpson
Pte John A Storey
Pte Joseph W Switzer
Pte Frederick H Tryon
Sgt John Turriff
Thomas Russell Watson
Pte Wellesley Wesley-Long
Pte Edwin Whitefoot
Pte J Wilson
Pte Norman Wilson
Pte Hilliard Wood
* Two buried at Ramillies British Cemetery
** Buried at Bucquoy Road Cemetery
Ficheux France
*** Buried at Marcoing Line, British Cemetery at Sailly, France.
Cemetery was later named the Cantimpre Canadian Cemetery

~ Those without stars, died October 11, 1918 and are buried at
Niagara Cemetery, Nord, France.

Within the biographies are excerpts from the 21st Battalion war diary regarding the Battle of Iwuy.

October 9, 1918.

“The 21 st Canadian Battalion will cross the Canal de L’Escaut over bridge …[location] at
0800 hours this date, and occupy billets in ESCAUDOEUVRES.”Full text of “21st Infantry Battalion War Diary (1915-1919)” at Archive.org

The 21 st Battalion War Diary mentions that on October 11th the Unit commanders met at 0100 hours to arrange the operation and details. The 20th Canadian Battalion was readied in the rear of the 21st Canadian Battalion, and they were ready to proceed at 0900 hours. The German troops shelled the area with H.E. and Gas from 05:30 hours onward. At 0900 hours, the 146th Bridage commenced to the the right of the 21st Canadian Battalion. Especially during the first hour of this advance on the high ground of Avesnes-Le-Sec many casualties were sustained as the Germans opened fire with machine guns. “Fifty percent of our Officers, N.C.O.s and Lewis Gunners became casualties during the first half hour of the action.” 21st Battalion

“The 4 th Canadian Infantry Brigade will continue the attack tomorrow, 11 th October, at
0900 hours, with the object of capturing AVESNES-le-SEC and move on to NOVELLES, and
attempt to make good crossing over River ERCLIN.
Full text of “21st Infantry Battalion War Diary (1915-1919)”

The action proceeded promptly at 0900 hours with the 146th Brigade on the right of the 21st Canadian Battalion. As the advance continued on the high ground south-west of Avesnes-Le-Sec and suffered many casualties from German machine gun fire. The enemy then brought out tanks as a counter measure. The Canadians withdrew to re-organize. 21 st Battalion war diary source

Now the 20th Canadian Battalion, was immediately after the 21st Canadian Battalion, and the 20th was the left attacking flank. After the withdrawal, the advance continued onwards at 1530 hours on October 11th. Now the 6th Canadian Infantry Brigade was fighting on the left. 21 st Battalion war diary source

As can be seen in the Military Cross Citation for Captain Baxter, “He [Baxter] pushed forward with his company, and having use of all his Lewis guns and three captured machine guns, was able to force the tanks to retire, thereby enabling the position to be held, and the advance to continue later.” source- Battling Tanks at Iwuy: The last German use of tanks in World War 1

“Thirteen Officers of those who went forward with the Battalion became casualties on October 10th – 11th.” Highest honours were bestowed. source 21 st Battalion war diary source

[October 11th/12th.] “Our casualties during the advance of the day were: Officers killed, 3; died of wounds, 1; wounded, 6; wounded at duty, 2; Gassed 1; Other Rankes, killed 39; wounded 272; Missing 2.” 21 st Battalion war diary source



The 51st (Highland) Division The 51st Division War Sketches by Fred. A. Farrell.

ANDERSON, Carl Werner{Saskatoon, SK) Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial. SVWM.

Anderson, Carl Werner January 1, 1890 – October 11, 1918. Enlistment Nov. 6, 1916, Saskatoon, SK Canadian Virtual War Memorial. Government of Canada. Veterans Affairs.

Barnes, Deward and Bruce Cane. Chapter 11. The Armistice, October 9, 1918 to February 10, 1919 It made you think of home: The Haunting Journal of Deward Barnes, Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1916-1919
Edition illustrated, annotated
Publisher Dundurn, 2004
ISBN 1550025120, 9781550025125

Digitized online by Google Books. Pages 256-265.

Barry, Bill. Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial World War I, Use advanced search for Niagara Cemetery, Iwuy France.

Saskatchewan Personnel
Cimetiè re Iwuy carré militaire
Niagara Cemetery, Iwuy, Nord, France

Given Names Surname Country of Background Citations
Carl Werner Anderson Born Boslau, Sweden, Enlistment Saskatoon, SK, Died Naves, France. British War Medal, Victory Medal
William James Beetham Birth Northallerton, North Yorkshire, England, Residence Paddockwood, SK, Employed and enlistment at Winnipeg, MB, Died Thun-Saint-Martin.
John Henry Belt Born Darlington, Durham, England, Residence “Little Red River Reserve”, Ailingly, SK, Enlistment, Prince Albert, SK, Died Thun-Saint-Martin. Military Medal
William Jasper Benson * Born Bellingham, Lac qui Parle Co, Minnesota, Farmer at Cabri, SK, Parents reside Watrous, SK, Died Thun-Saint-Martin
James Cameron Born Mont Nebo, NWT, Enlistment Prince Albert, SK, Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
Charles Daniels Born Battleford, NWT, Enlisted Winnipeg, MB, Residence Meadow Lake, SK, and Onion Lake, SK. Re-enlisted Saskatoon, SK Died Thun-Saint-Martin
Turnbull Davidson Born Belsay, Northumberland, England. Residence Rabbit Lake, SK then Square Hill, SK. Enlistment Battleford, SK. Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
George Humphrey Dayman Born Whitewood, NWT, Residence Windthorst, SK, Enlistment Regina, SK,
Joseph Degrasse Born Bathurst, Gloucester Co., New Brunswick, Residence Big River, SK, Enlistment Regina, SK, Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
George Derby Born province of Ontario, Parents from Quebec, Residence Ernfold, SK, Enlistment Regina, SK, Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
Peter L Drake Born Dunnville, Haldminad Co, Ontario, Residence Buchanan, SK and Birch Hills, SK, Enlistment Prince Albert, SK, Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
Herman Dycke Born Winkler, Mb, Residence Warman, SK, Enlistment Saskatoon, SK, Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
Edwin Goff Born Clarenceville, MRC de Haut-Richelieu, Quebec, Residence Rouleau, SK, Enlistment Regina, SK, Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
Edwin Hartsook Born Sioux Falls, Minnehaha Co. South Dakota, ResidenceT Sceptre, SK, Enlistment Regina, Sk, Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
Alfred Hermanson Born Sweden. Residence Sturgis, Sk. Enlistment Melville, SK. Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
Isaiah Hopson Born Lower Gornal, West Midlands, England. Residence Estevan, SK. Enlistment Estevan, Sk. Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
Levi Hyde Born Somerset, England, Labourer at Springside, SK (resident), enlistment at Yorkton, SK, Died Thun-Saint-Martin.
Montague Ewart Miller Kemp Born Rotherfield, East Sussex, England. Residence Prince Albert, SK. Enlistment Prince Albert, SK. Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
John Wasdale Lowes Born Bosworth, Wellington Co., Ontario. Residence Saskatoon, SK. Enlistment Prince Albert, SK. Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
Isaac Morris Born Montgomery, Powys, Wales. Residence Wideview, SK. Enlistment Regina, SK. Death Thun-Saint-Martin.
James Leo O’Connor Born Lonsdale, Hastings Co. Ontario. Residence Gull Lake, SK. Enlistment Kingston, Frontenac Co., Ontario.
Francis Silver Born Barnstable, Barnstable Co, Massachusetts. Residence Tregarva, SK. Enlistment Regina, SK. Death northeast of Cambrai.
John Kearse Wakeling Born Greater London, England. Parents Maple Creek, SK. Residence Fox Valley, Sk. Enlistment Maple Creek, SK. Death Iwuy.
Wellesley Tylney Wesley-Long Born Munising, Alger Co., Michigan. Residence Saskatoon, SK. Parents of Munich, Bavaria, Germany. Enlistment Saskatoon, SK. Death northeast of Cambrai.
Prince George Wheater Parents Flockton Manor House, Wakefield, England. Served with Saskatchewan Regiment, Canadian Infantry.
Raynor Wright Born Peterborough, England, Residence Marieton, SK. Enlistment Regina, SK. Died Iwuy. Military Medal
* William Jasper Benson buried at Iwuy communal cemetery
Note: Those soldiers born in the NWT were born in the North-West Territories of Canada. It was not until 1905 that the province of Saskatchewan was formed, and Mont Nebo, Battleford, and Whitewood were all placenames of Saskatchewan after this date.

Battle of Cambrai (1917) wikipedia

Battling Tanks at Iwuy the Last German use of Tanks in World War i Word Press. Link recommended by Al Lloyd historian for the 21 st Canadian Battalion


BENSON, William Jasper; {Cabri, SK) Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial. SVWM.

BEETHAM, William James; {Paddockwood, SK) Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial. SVWM.

BENSON, William Jasper, September 1, 1895-October 11, 1918, Watrous, Saskatchewan. Canadian Virtual War Memorial. Government of Canada. Veterans Affairs.

Between Long Lake and Last Mountain : Bulyea, Duval, Strasbourg.
Publisher, Date:
Strasbourg, Sask. : Strasbourg, Bulyea, Duval History Book Committee, 1982.
ISBN:
0889252327 (This book mentions Raynor Wright in the Roll of Honour listing.)

Borch, Peter. 28th Northwest Canadian Infantry Battalion. Saskatchewan Encyclopedia. Canadian Plains Research Center. University of Regina. 2006.

Cameron, James image Pages of the Past : History of Shell Lake-Mont Nebo districts

Published by Shell Lake: Shell Lake History (1986) (1986)

ISBN: 0 889 25487 7 , 9780 889 25487 9

Canadian Expeditionary Force Study Group. “The Matrix Project” 21st Battalion.

Canadian Great War Project

Canadian Virtual War Memorial Charles Daniels Veterans Affaires Remembrance Memorials Veterans Affairs Canada

Date modified:
2015-08-12

Cavalry in Training. National Film Board. “The Canadian Light Horse (CLH), distinct from the CCB, was formed in early 1917 from the 19th Alberta Dragoons, the 1st Hussars and the 16th Light Horse. The unit reported to Canadian Corps Headquarters and first saw action at Vimy Ridge in April 1917. The CLH played a key role at Iwuy on October 10, 1918, where the last ever swords-drawn Canadian cavalry charge took place. In the final month of the war, the CLH were in front as a scouting force that ensured protection against attacks by German layback controls. ”

[1] Chief Military Personnel CMP Home > Canadian Military Journal CMJ Home > More Fighting for Canada: Five Battles 1760-1944. Book Reviewed by Major James D. McKillip. Government of Canada. Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces. Book recommended by Michel Lespagnol, Iwuy, France Historian

Conclusion of the Battle of Iwuy. Forgotten Books.ca. Canadas Hundred Days with the CAnadian Corps from Amiens to Mons. p. 310

DANIELS, Charles, (Battleford, Onion Lake, Saskatoon, Meadow Lake, Sk)Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial (SVWM)

DANIELS, Charles Canadian War Graves Commission CWGC

From Warriors to Soldiers. List of Native Veterans. Iwuy.

Frost, Cecil Gray (1897-1947) 6th Brigade Canadian Machine Gun Company. Cecil Gray Frots (1897-1947). WWI Correspondence 1917-1919. Letter 18 16 October 1918 – France – an extremely slight wound … saw the fall of Cambrai

[5] Greenhouse, Brereton, James McWilliams, R. James Steel, Kevin R. Shackleton, George H. Cassar, and Bruce Cane. The Torch We Throw: The Dundurn WWI Historical Library: Amiens/Second to None/The Making of Billy Bishop/Hell in Flanders Fields/It Made you Think of Home The Torch We Throw: The Dundurn WWI Historical Library Illustrated Edition. Dundurn, 2014. ISBN 1459730305, 9781459730304 link recommended by Michel Lespagnol, Iwuy, France Historian


Horses in World War I Wikipedia.

HYDE, Levi {Springside, SK) Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial. SVWM.

Infantry Regiments. The South Saskatchewan Regiment. Volume 3, Part 2. National Defence and the Canadian Forces. Government of Canada. 2010-11-25

Kemp, Montague Ewart Miller. May 25, 1898- October11, 1918. Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. Canadian Virtual War Memorial. Government of Canada. Veterans Affairs.

In Memory by Pierre Vanderfelden The visit of Commonwealth graves in Communals Cemeteries & Churchyards in Belgium & France

KEMP, Montague Ewart Miller. (Prince Albert, Sk) Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial (SVWM)

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) Military Heritage. Canada and the First World War.
Date Created: 2000-11-11
Date Modified: 2008-11-07

Lindsay, Robert 28th North-West Battalion Headquarters. 2006

McPherson, Arlean.

The Battlefords : a history.

Publisher, Date:
Saskatoon : Modern Press, [c1967]
Commissioned by the Town Council of Battleford and the City Council of North Battleford to commemorate the anniversary of 100 years of Confederation. (This book mentions that J. Daniels served with No. J. Company, North West Rebellion of 1885 according to a quote from the April 23, 1885 edition of the Saskatchewan Herald newspaper)

Minutes the Western Front Association.

Niagra Cemetery Iwuy, Nord, France. Private 886397 Peter L. Drake

28th Bn. Canadian Infantry (Saskatchewan Regiment)

10/10/1918

Son of Peter Montrose and Elizabeth Ann Cowell Drake of Dunn Township, Haldimand County, Ontario, Canada.

Row. E. 8.

Enlisted 18/02/1916

[2]Nicholson, G.W.L. (1964). Official History of the Canadian Army in the First World War: Canadian Expeditionary Force, 1914-1919 (pdf) (2nd ed.). Ottawa: Duhamel, Queen’s Printer and Controller of Stationery. p. 458. Retrieved 26 April 2011.

[3] Nicholson, G. W. L. 1962. Official History of the Canadian Army in the First World War: Canadian Expeditionary Force 1914-1919. Queens Printer and Controller of Stationary, Ottawa, Canada. Chapter XV Canadian Expeditionary Force (doc) The Final Advance. 12 October – 11 November. The Enemy Faces Defeat. Nicholson Matrix


 

Old Strathcona Remembers (OSR). (Edmonton, Alberta). Light Horse Park Application

  • Approval of Ligh Horse Park Naming, Strathcona Light Horse History, Map of Park Location in Strathcona Neighbourhood, Edmonton, Alberta. (pdf)
  • Naming Committee (pdf)
  • At the present, the Old Strathcona Remembers (OSR) committee has been successful in having an unnamed park at Strathcona, 84-85 Ave and Gateway Blvd – 104 St named the Light House Park. The history of the park area is closely related to World War I overseas theatre of battle as “In 1914, Edmonton’s cavalry soldiers and horses departed for service from the Strathcona train station in what is now Old Strathcona” – quote from the committee pdf. “A Squadron, Canadian Light Horse, made the last cavalry charge in Canadian history at the battle of Iwuy on 10 October 1918. This means that among the predecessor units of the The South Alberta Light Horse, or SALH… mounted the last cavalry charge in Canadian history.”[Wikipedia]

    Upon contacting the Old Strathcona Remmbers (OSR) Committee, Stephen “Sticks” Gallard, Chair OSR replied that “4 years ago we (OSR) started having Nov 11th parades in the unnamed park just west of the Connaught Armouries built in 1914 for the 19th Alberta Dragoons now folded into the SALH. OSR was started to address moving an original Legion Memorial located in the south end of the park to the north end ..to create a better space for the growing number of participants both military and civilian to attend. This idea took off and we then decided to build a better monument with an interactive park around it to showcase the relationship of the park, Connaught Armouries and the old rail-head across Gateway Blvd where the troops in WW1 would have embarked heading east to be shipped over to the battle fields of Europe during WW1.”

    Remebrance Day 2014 – Holy Trinity Church (near Light Horse Park

    “There is currently a small monument put in by the Legion in 1967 which will be
    relocated and enhanced using it as the middle piece of the new monument. Once done we
    hope to have the Feds certify it as an official Cdn war memorial.”

    “During all of this I realized the park had never been named and submitted for consideration and
    the subsequent approval Sept 2014 of the name of Light Horse Park. The logic behind this name
    was to reflect on the SALH a cavalry Regiment, the other units folded into it such as 19th AB Dragoons
    and also as homage to the horsemanship skills Albertan’s have always shown which lead to many of them
    being assigned to the Remounts Depot in Southhampton UK in WW1.”

    “Thus we now are working on raising funds to complete this project and hope to have it done by the
    spring of 2018 to coincide with the centenary of the end of WW1.” Proposed Perspective for Park (pdf) Proposal for park in 2018 (jpg picture)

    “We are seeking corporate and private sponsors and will also be doing a sponsor a brick to have
    a loved one lost in conflict inscribed on it to forever be a part of the parks rich history.” : Old Strathcona Remembers: Op Legacy Enhance (Word document) Stakeholders and Supporters

    “Our organization is requesting funds to help us in our goal to relocate and enhance by way of developing an interpretive park around it a monument that we can seek Federal recognition of as a certified Canadian war monument. This would be the only such monument in Old Strathcona and with reading boards around the monument would link the histories of the Connaught Armouries, the Railhead of the early 1900s across from it and the park now known as Light Horse Park and Holy Trinity Anglican the units Regimental Church. This project would also recognize those who gave the ultimate sacrifice, the units that were involved as are now represented by The South Alberta Light Horse the provinces oldest regiment and the rich history of Old Strathcona. The park where it will be located 8513 104St is where troops and their horses were marshaled and processed through the armories to embark for the battlefields of Europe from the railhead across the street now known as Gateway Blvd. Completion date is designed to coincide with the centenary of the end of WW1 at which time we envision it being full readied for public use. We meet the Edmonton salutes mandate as this entire project is related to those who served and their legacies. Further it will allow people for generations to understand and recognize what the area of Old Strathcona went through sending its loved ones off to war.”… This quotation is an introduction from the Old Strathcona Remembers: Op Legacy Enhance (Word document)

    Linda Duncan NDP MP for Edmonton Strathcona (Alberta) tweeted: “Here’s hoping we have Light Horse Park cenotaph in place to celebrate Canada’s 150th” (which happens to be 2017).

    There have been newsprint interviews, a podcast on CTV news, and a piece on CBC radio one.

    “We received a donation of 300 bricks from the U of A when they tore down 100 yr old homes for the
    new Loughheed Centre for LEadership, another 300 or so from a gent who had bricks from a torn
    down 1893 home and we will be getting more from the Leamington Mansion which was also a 100 years
    old which burnt down just over a 1 week ago.” Above notes are from an email from Stephen “Sticks” Gallard, Chair OSR supported by some current events news articles.

  • Kent, Gordon, Group using old bricks for new memorial honouring Edmonton’s First World War history. Edmonton Journal. October 25, 2015
  • Leamington Mansion bricks to live on as part of war memorial Metro News Edmonton.

[4] Patterson, Tim. New Brunswick Land Company and the Settlement of Stanley and Harvey. Harvey Cenotaph Index Page

In memory of
Lance Corporal
NORMAN JAMES ROBISON

Potter, Stephanie E. “Smile and Carry On” Canadian Cavalry on the Western Front, 1914-1918. (2013) The University of Western Ontario. Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository. Paper 1226. [speaks to the use of tanks and the Cavalry in WWI. The cavalry actions of October 9 and 10 are discussed on Page 324-330 of the paper (the Adobe Acrobat Reader pdf pages are 335-341.]

Private Levi Hyde. “Born 17 Mar 1888 Walton, Somerset, England. Emigrated to Canada 17 Apr 1912. Married Elsie Parratt 1913 in Springside, Saskatchewan. Father of Arthur and Doris. Enlisted 28th Battalion 15 Oct 1915. Killed on last day of the Battle of Iwuy, aged 30.” Burial:
Niagara Cemetery
Iwuy
Departement du Nord
Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
Plot: E. 26.

Royal Regina Rifles Wikipedia

South Alberta Light Horse

Springside and district memoirs.
Publisher, Date:
[Springside, Sask. : Springside Historical Society, 1983] (This book mentions Private Levi Hyde in the roll of Honour listing)

Tempest, Capt. E.V. Title History of the Sixth Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment: Volume I.—1/6th Battalion, Volume 1

Edition reprint
Publisher Andrews UK Limited, 2012
ISBN 1781515271, 9781781515273 Digitized online by Google Books

Wakeling, John Kearse- age 32 – October 11, 1918 Maple Creek, Saskatchewan Canadian Virtual War Memorial. Government of Canada. Veterans Affairs.

War Diary of the 18th Battalion CEF Battling Tanks at Iwuy The last German use of tanks in World War One.

Wartime letters of Leslie and Cecil Frost 1915-1919 R. B. Fleming. Wilfrid Laurier University Press. 007

Wells, Jennifer. Last Commonwealth Soldier killed in WWI. George Price from Moose Jaw, Sask, was shot in the back, possibly while trying to steal a kiss from a Belgian Woman Toronto Star. Nov 09 2014

Wheater, Prince George. May 26, 1894- October11, 1918. Canadian Infantry Saskatchewan Regiment. Canadian Virtual War Memorial. Government of Canada. Veterans Affairs.

Wright, Raynor. June 4, 1886-October 11, 1918. Marieton, Saskatchewan. Canadian Virtual War Memorial. Government of Canada. Veterans Affairs.

WRIGHT, Raynor, (Bulyea, Sk) Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial (SVWM)

Canadian Mounted Rifles_poster

Rifles poster Canadian Mounted.
Canadian Mounted Rifles poster

Bibliography:
To: saskgenweb@yahoo.com
From: Michel Lespagnol
Subject: Soldier

If you have further information about the Battle of Iwuy, know of a source of information, the global involvement of soldiers or biography of those who served from Saskatchewan at the Battle of Iwuy, please e-mail Julia Adamson, Saskatchewan and Michel Lespagnol, Iwuy, France Thank you.

Will These World War I War Medals Make Their Way Home?

14 Jul

 

Will These World War I War Medals Make Their Way Home?

Can you help?

The British War Medal World War I.

The British War Medal World War I.


…..Peter Willcock began a search to locate the descendants of a World War I veteran in the hopes to restore the war medals to the John Bryson’s family ancestors. Beginning in Ontario, this mystery unravels with ancestral clues found overseas in Scotland, and continues with a search for descendants in Western Canada – Saskatchewan and Manitoba. It is hoped that the family of John Bryson can be located.

…..Willcock is helping a friend to track down the family. “When my friend was a boy, his family moved into a a rental house in what today is the Toronto area. That’s probably about 50 years ago now. There was a pile of junk in the basement which his mother asked him to clean out. In the process he found this WW1 medal, and he kept it all these years until maybe 5-6 years ago when he tried to start looking for some family member or descendant who might like to have the medal.”

…..Willcock came to his friend’s assistance as he had a computer whereas, his friend was not online. In the course of their online research they have delved into quite a lot of information. They feel that they may have possibly identified grand nieces or nephews in Scotland.

John Bryson

…..The veteran’s name is John Bryson; Regimental Number 105984; who resided on a farm in Indian Head, Saskatchewan in the year 1921. He was single, and aged 38. He was born Eaglesham, Renfrewshire, Scotland in October 31, 1883. He reported an address of Palmer House, Regina, Saskatchewan when he enlisted April 4, 1916. James Bryson, of Cambuslang, Lanarkshire, Scotland was given as his next of kin – his father. John’s employment was recorded as teamster.
…..In the book, Indian Head : history of Indian Head and district on page 165, the local history book committee state that James Bryson was wounded in World War I, and no other “Bryson” are listed in the World War I honour roll. There is another Bryson mentioned in the book, however, that of Jean Bryson who married James Harvey Francis (1859 Pakenham, Ontario-), namesake of the town of Francis. Miss Jean Craig Bryson (Mrs. Jean Francis) was the daughter of the Honourable Senator George Bryson of Fort Coulonge, Quebec, and together they had a son, Jonathon Francis. George Bryson, Sr. was the son of James Bryson and Jane Cochrane and arrived in 1814 to Ramsay, Lanark, Ontario. George married Robina Cobb in 1845, and had seven children – two of whom were George Bryson Junior, and Thomas Bryson. However, this book makes no mention of John Bryson at all, unless he went by a nick name of James Bryson. Nor is there any evidence that John Bryson was related to the aforementioned Jean Bryson and the notable Bryson figures from Quebec.

…..

Alexander Sr. Bryson (Sandy)

…..It is believed that Alexander Sr. Bryson (Sandy) was John’s uncle, and that Alexander lived in Sintaluta, Saskatchewan. Alexander (1869-Sept 21, 1958) was born 1869 in Eaglesham, Scotland, and had five children after he married Jeanie Moffat (1867-1920). Sandy arrived in 1911, and his family followed in 1912. He lived on township 17 range 11 west of the second meridian. His children were (William) James (1893 – 1933), Alex Jr. (1895-1916 threshing accident), John (Jack) (1897- ), Tom (1900- ), and a daughter Jeanie aged 12 on the 1916 census. Jean went on to marry Mr. Boyd and reside in Vantage, Saskatchewan. Jack and Thomas themselves, relocated to Winnipeg, Manitoba according to page 338 of the book, Sintaluta 1880-1984 / Tales of the Red Fox: Assiniboine Reserve, Town of Sintaluta, Districts of Allindale, Durham, Blackwood, Red Fox, and Spring Coulee.

…..The eldest of the family, listed as William in the local history book, and as James on the Canadian Census, enlisted July 28, 1915, recorded his occupation as a farmer at Sintaluta, and married. James Bryson 115055, lists Cambuslang, Scotland, as his place of birth on his enlistment record and went overseas with the 10th Canadian Mounted Rifles.

….Another brother, Corporal John Bryson 115056, born December 10, 1897, enlisted December 19, 1914, at Shorncliff and states that he is, at the time, an unmarried farmer. His next of kin listed was Alexander Bryson, of Sintaluta, Saskatchewan. He also was born in Cambuslang, Scotland. John was placed with the 10th Canadian Mounted Rifles.

….The youngest brother, SPR Thomas Bryson 2504238, enlisted with a birth date of June 9, 1899, and gave his mother, Jeanie Bryron, of Sintaluta, Saskatchewan as his next of kin. It was a practice for younger men to alter their birth dates in order to enlist and serve their country. Sapper (abbreviated Spr) is the Royal Engineers’ equivalent of Private He listed that he was a labourer when he signed up in Winnipeg, Manitoba on June 1, 1918. Tom recorded Glasgow, Scotland as his location of birth. He initially served with Regina Recruits Engineers.

Location

…..According to Map quest Indian Head and Sintaluta are 18 kilometers (11 miles) apart, and both are currently located on the Trans – Canada 1 highway. In the era of horse and buggy or ox and cart this would enable relatives to help one another out during times of harvest. On average, a horse walks at approximately 4 miles per hour (6.5 km/hour) which would make it a three hour journey between Indian Head and Sintaluta. It was common that relatives would homestead and farm near one another to assist with homestead duties and harvest.

…..On an historical railway map of 1925, it can be see that Indian Head and Sintaluta were both on the Canadian Pacific Transcontinental Railway (West). Indian Head, the closer of the two locations to the provincial capital of Regina is 70 kilomters (44 miles) from that city. Indian Head locates at the legal land location of section 24- township 18- range 13-West of the second meridian at Latitude – Longitude (DMS) 50° 32′ 1″ N, 103° 40′ 3″ W, and Sintaluta at section 33- township 17 – range 11-West of the 2nd meridian or Latitude – Longitude (DMS) 50° 28′ 37″ N, 103° 26′ 59″ W.

…..It is interesting to note that the “The Bryson Maur School Dist No 3312 historical one room school house was located on the SE quarter of section 29 township 24 range 19 W2″. Bill Barry gives the spelling of this same school house as Bryn Mawr school 33312 at the same location; SE 29 24 19 W2. Barry attributes the name to a settler from Wales who named it after Brynmawr in Wales, so it is not likely that the first name Bryson Maur had any roots in this Bryson family.

Can you help?

…..It is with heartfelt wishes that some kind reader recognizes the family, and can come forward as an ancestor of John Bryson, the holder of these World War One Medals. Perhaps the The Royal Canadian Legion may be able to help out. They even have a Sintaluta branch, and an Indian Head branch and so they may even know this John Bryson. “Legion members care deeply about supporting the men and women who serve this country and want to make a difference in the lives of Veterans, contribute to our communities, and Remember those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our Country…The Royal Canadian Legion [members] …. make a difference in the lives of Veterans and their families, provide essential services within our communities, and Remember the men and women who made the ultimate sacrifice for our Country.”

…..Perhaps the Indian Head townspeople can know of the family and can pinpoint the relations of John Bryson, or similarly, Sintaluta historians may remember the family of Alexander Bryson. In this way, the relatives can contact Willcock. The Winnipeg library or archives may have information about John (Jack) Bryson or Tom Bryson in an Henderson’s Directory. The hamlet of or “designated place” of Vantage is considered a ghost town. It may be that the Rural Municipality No. 103 – SUTTON would have information about the residents, and Mrs. Jeanie (nee Bryson) Boyd who took residence there.

….. Trying to identify the family of John Bryson presents a mystery, indeed, to Willcock, and his friend. With a few key details, they are trying to locate the rightful owner of the military medals. By furthering their enquiry online and receiving tips, Willcock searched outside of the province of Ontario. to seek out the rightful owner.

…..In Australia and New Zealand, the Purple Hearts Reunited are groups of researchers have come together to return lost medals to veterans or to their families. With success stories such as lost war medals returned after facebook post, it is hoped, that these war medals, too, may make their way back to John Bryson’s ancestors.

…..These precious mementos bestowed upon a Canadian military veteran, would come home at last if they could be restored. Medals “connect recipients to a time in their lives when serving our nation took precedence over all else. ” As the centenary of the First World War (1914-1918) is being commemorated and remembered, what fitting tribute, that to find the home of a distinctive, original, valuable, irreplaceable medal. This would provide the family with an ancestral connection to their family member who served, and who fought for our country. The medals themselves, honour the man, John Bryson, and the sacrifices he made for this country of Canada.

Bibliography:

Geographic Names of Saskatchewan
Barry, Bill. Centax Books, A Division of PrintWest Communications Ltd. 2005. ISBN 1-897020-19-2

Indian Head: History of Indian Head and District.

The History Book Committee
Indian Head, Saskatchewan The History Book Committee 1984

ISBN Number 0919781268 / 9780919781269

Sintaluta 1880-1984 / Tales of the Red Fox
Assiniboine Reserve, Town of Sintaluta, Districts of Allindale, Durham, Blackwood, Red Fox, and Spring Coulee

Chabun, Will. Mini-mystery surrounds Sask. Veteran’s medal. Regina Leader Post. July 28, 2015. Article also appears: Star Phoenix Facebook Star Phoenix

Published 1985 by Sintaluta & District History Book Committee .
ISBN 10 0889254982

All online sources are embedded in the text of the story as hyper links.

To contribute or add further information, please e-mail

The above web page was created and placed online by
author Julia Adamson ,
and researcher
Peter Willcock

University of Saskatchewan Remembers World War I

9 Aug

World War One Remembered at the University of Saskatchewan

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration CommitteeHonourRollAddendum-Professor Dean McNeil trumpet solo-2
Honour Roll Addendum
Professor Dean McNeil Trumpet Solos The Last Post and Reveille

On Thursday August 7, 2014 the “Honouring our heroes” program commemorated those students, faculty and staff who fought in the First World War (1914-1918) in Convocation Hall, Peter MacKinnon Building on the University of Saskatchewan Campus. According to the University of Saskatchewan media advisory, Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer, Interim President and Vice-Chancellor Gordon Barnhart, and history student Eric Story related that this is the first of many commemorative events planned in honour of the centennial year. World War I commenced August 4, 1914.

Pezer recounted that while World War I “produced unprecedented slaughter” of those “sent forth to the Great War”, the effects of the war had a “profound effect upon the province” as well as established a “growing sense of national pride.” “Beyond fighting there were many ways that the University” contributed to the war effort, such as chaplin Edmund Oliver who joined the Western Universities Battalion with the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF). Edmund helped to establish the University of Vimy Ridge and worked on the battle fields in France serving the sick, the wounded soldiers, and advising families when enlisted personnel gave the supreme sacrifice.

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee veiled plaques honouring our heroes
Veiled Plaques Honouring our heroes
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee r, Interim President and Vice-Chancellor Gordon Barnhart - history student Eric Story-Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer
Interim President and Vice-Chancellor Gordon Barnhart, history student Eric Story, Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer.
Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee veiled plaques honouring our heroes Interim President and Vice-Chancellor Gordon Barnhart - history student Eric Story-Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer
Interim President and Vice-Chancellor Gordon Barnhart, history student Eric Story, Chancellor Emerita Vera Pezer

Research conducted by Professor Emeritus of History, Michael Hayden, found those names missing during the original commemoration services held by the University of Saskatchewan. 349 men and one woman are named on the walls of the Peter McKinnon Building National Historic Site of Canada (the former College Building ). Memorial ribbons are inscribed with the names of 298 military personnel, noting additionally those who were wounded wounded, or killed in action. Accompanying the ribbons are 34 names mostly of the Royal Air Force. Another 23 names commemorate the volunteer nurses of the Emmanuel College Hospital who served during the 1918 Influenza Epidemic. The names of 18 service personnel were dedicated at this ceremony on a plaque unveiled August 7, 2014. This plaque will be mounted outside of Convocation Hall and in this way these eighteen heroes of World War I will be honoured prominently in the first building erected on the University of Saskatchewan grounds.

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee slide show
Slide Show
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Eric Story History Student
Eric Story History Student University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Interview of MichaelHayden at Honouring our Heroes
Interview of MichaelHayden at Honouring our Heroes
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee JGDiefenbakerMemorialRibbon
J.G. Diefenbaker Memorial Ribbon

Following speeches given by Pezer, Barnhart and Story, the names of those commemorated on the plaque were read out. The “Last Post” trumpet solo rang out by Professor Dean McNeil. A moment of silence followed and then the “Reveille” trumpet solo rung out paying especial tribute to those students, faculty and staff named upon the plaque.

O Valiant Hearts.

World War I hymn

O valiant hearts who to your glory came

Through dust of conflict and through battle flame;

Tranquil you lie, your knightly virtue proved,

Your memory hallowed in the land you loved.

~ Sir John Stanhope Arkwright

 

Barnhart related a lesson taken on by history students where each pupil in the class was assigned a country. The assignment was to “trace through hour by hour and day by day the events leading up to … August 4, 1914, the beginning of the first world war one”. Such an indepth study brings home the politics one hundred years ago, that even though August 4 officially started the war, there were many contributing factors and forces in play which finally gave way to the imminence of war.

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Memorial Ribbons Admiration
Memorial Ribbons Admiration
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Petty Officer 1st Class Warren Noble CD Recruiter
University of Saskatchewan
Memorial Ribbons Plaque
Petty Officer 1st Class Warren Noble CD Recruiter
HMCS Unicorn
National Defence
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Honour Roll Addendum Professor Dean McNeil Trumpet Solos
Honour Roll Addendum ~ Professor Dean McNeil Trumpet Solos
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Petty Officer 1st Class Warren Noble CD Recruiter Sub Lieutenant Alicia Morris
Petty Officer 1st Class Warren Noble CD Recruiter
Sub Lieutenant Alicia Morris
HMCS Unicorn
National Defence

Though the University had only been open for seven years, Barnhart recounts that within three months of the First World War commencement, a recruitment program was in place. Seventy five per cent of the student body saw active service. Alongside students, staff and faculty served in the war effort. So many were absent from the College of Engineering, that it was forced to close during the 1916-7 academic year amid the Great War.

Regarding the students enrolled on the University campus in 1914; “It’s highly traumatic for that small academic community, because these people were walking beside them a short time before, and now they’re in the army, and now they’re dead.” ~ James Pitsula retired University of Regina History Professor.[[1]

Students were given one year’s credit towards their degree program which at the time they felt was a triumphant entitlement as the war was predicted to last short of one year. Faculty positions were held for all those who had enlisted.

During the renovations of the Peter McKinnon building a special insulation was installed over the memorial ribbons which was then encased in plywood casings to preserve the historic carvings. In this way no paint, no hammer nor any construction event could damage the commemorative ribbons.

“War changed Canada,” Barnhart affirmed, “in many ways Canada was no longer a colony”. Canada may have entered the Great War as a colony, however emerged as a country in its own right signing the armistice alongside the Allies of World War I on November 11, 1918.

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Memorial GSwift-JDCumming-HJBlair-MemorialRibbons
G Swift-J D Cumming-H J Blair-Memorial Ribbons

Story spoke on behalf of the University of Saskatchewan’s Great War Commemoration Committee which is chaired by Professor Emeritus Bill Waiser. This ceremony, the “Remember Us – Honouring our heroes” unveiling ceremony is the inaugural event sponsored by the Great War Commemoration Committee, there will be many more memorial events upcoming in the next four years.

Joseph Boyden has been scheduled to give a talk about two aboriginal snipers of World War I whom he wrote about in the much acclaimed novel, “Three Day Road”. There is in the making the “Great War Soiree” which will feature a theatrical number, and a musical score in tribute to the First World War.

In the works, is a public talk by Brain Gable, University of Saskatchewan alumnus, and award winning cartoonist for the Globe and Mail. Gable depicts editorial or political cartoons, containing commentaries and illustrations relating to the effects that the Great War had on society during the contemporary news releases of the Great War Centenary. His cartoons provide insight into issues and historical context of World War I embracing sensitivity, seriousness and satire on the outcome of events with a point of view 100 years later.

Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee College Building Plaque
College Building Plaque
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Memorial Peter McKinnon Building National Historic Site College Building
Peter McKinnon-(College Building) National Historic Site
Honouring our heroes - Remember Us - University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Committee Peter McKinnon Building -College Building Plaque.
Peter McKinnon Building -College Building Plaque

Proposals yet to come from the Great War Commemoration Committee may feature the following. In 2016, a feature based upon the “The Antiques Road Show” will take place showcasing memorabilia, artefacts and antiques from the Great War. A culinary week is in progress studying the recipes and foods sustaining the appetites during the First World War years. Finally in 2018, the University of Saskatchewan Archives website will be completed and expanded with an grand ceremony unveiling featured topics such as “How to research”, blogs and articles on the Great War.

The Soul of the Soldier
Sketches from the Western Battle-Front

A Belgian Poem

“I came to a halt at the bend of the road;

I reached for my ration, and loosened my load;

I came to a halt at the bend of the road.

“For thee that I loved, I went down to the grave,

Pay thou the like forfeit thy Country to save;

For thee that I loved, I went down to the grave.

“Fulfilled is the sacrifice. Lord, is it well?

Be it said–for the dear sake of country he fell.

Fulfilled is the sacrifice. Lord, is it well?”

by Thomas Tiplady

While Story suggests these aformentioned ceremonies as tantalizing morsels of events yet to come over the next four years, it is by no means an exhaustive list. To follow more about plans undertaken by the Great War Commemoration Committee please see their facebook page and twitter page online.

World War I ~ “The war to end all wars”~ how is it remembered? The Great War Commemoration Committee tackles the issues, the evolution, and culture of the war years, and its impact on the University and its role in the greater community of the city of Saskatoon, the province of Saskatchewan the nation of Canada on the world stage. The evolution of the University was inevitable and dramatic during the war years contrasting sharply with the life of contemporary students, faculty and staff. The University of Saskatchewan’s motto Deo et Patriæ (Latin) translates to For God and Country.‘Deo et Patriæ’ has been the guiding slogan of the university since its foundation, and the strength and fervor of that slogan were amply demonstrated during the dark years of the War, when students and professors marched shoulder to shoulder in the grim chaos of Flanders.”
Saskatoon Star Phoenix [Saskatoon Daily Star] July 15, 1926.

UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN HONOUR ROLL ADDENDUM
Andrew Melville Anderson
Albert F. Bailey
Louis Brehaut 28th Bn.
John Rich Bunn Can. Army Med. Corps.
Harry Ray Contelon 1st Univ. Co., PPCLI,D
William Kenneth Forbes
J.W. French R.A.F.
General Middleton Grant 1st Depot Bn.
David Robert Green 1st Depot Bn., R.F.C.
William James Hall
William Cameron MacIntosh 28th Bn., 65th Overseas BN.
Kenneth McKenzie 196th Bn.
Vernon Ulysses Miner
Andrew Ernest Stewart
Robert Stewart 65th Bn, 72nd Bn, Wounded.
George Moir Weir
John McIntyre White Y.M.C.A. 46th Bn
Paul Peter Wiklund 44th Bn., Killed

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

Adamson, Julia. Archives ~Resources National, Provincial, City, and University archives. Saskatchewan Gen Web. April 10, 2014. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia. Libraries Resources Saskatchewan Gen Web. April 10, 2014. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia. War and Military resources Saskatchewan Gen Web. April 10, 2014. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia Millions of Archival Newspaper Pages set to go online Saskatchewan Gen Web E~Magazine May 27, 2014. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia. Michelle Lang. Canadian Journalist. Jan. 31, 1975-Dec 30, 2009. Afghanistan Casualty. Saskatchewan Gen Web E~Magazine November 11, 2012. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia. Naval Monument honours Royal Canadian Navy prairie seamen and RCN ships. H.M.C.S. Regina (K234) and H.M.C.S. Weyburn (K 173) Saskatchewan Gen Web E~Magazine September 25, 2013. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson, Julia. Montgomery Place Est. in 1946 by Our War Veterans. Saskatchewan Gen Web E~Magazine. October 9, 2013. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Adamson Julia. H.W. Balfour’s Truly Impressive Career. Recognized for Outstanding Civic Service and Meritorious Military Achievement. Saskatchewan Gen Web E~Magazine April 7, 2013 Date accessed August 7,2014.

Barnhart, Gordon. Oliver, Edmund H. (1882–1935) Encyclopedia of Saskatchewan. Canadian Plains Research Center. University of Regina. 2006. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Biber, Francois. Saskatoon Great War Memorial last of its kind in Canada. What began in 1923 remaing and has grown to more than 1,200 memorials CJME news. August 6, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Brian Gable. Wikipedia the free encyclopedia. July 30, 2013. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Brian Gable Editorial Cartoonist Bio. The Globe and Mail. June 3, 2009. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Brian Gable on Facebook Date accessed August 7, 2014.

[1] Charlton, Jonathan. Great War shaped Saskatoon and U of S The Saskatoon Star Phoenix. Page A5. Thursday July 31, 2014.

Coggins, Jack. A Chaplain’s War. Edmund Henry Oliver and the University of Vimy Ridge, 1916-1919 (pdf) Univeristy of Saskatchewan Library Archives. History Department Essays 2004. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Dawson, Anna-Lilja. The U of S held strong through the World Wars. The Sheaf. November 7, 2013. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

England declares war on Germany The Guardian. August 5, 1914. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Eric Story on Facebook Eric Story (The_RealEAS) on Twitter Date accessed August 7,2014.

Ferguson, Mark. The University of Saskatchewan will rename the historic College Building to the Peter MacKinnon Building to honour the outgoing U of S President. University of Saskatchewan News. June 14, 2012. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Gable, Brian 1949- Something about the author, Scholarly Magazines, Encyclopedia.com. January 2009. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Globe and Mail on Twitter (#globeandmail) ‘The war to end all wars’: Today’s editorial cartoon by Brian Gable. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Great War Commemoration Committee on Facebook. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Great War Commomoration Committee on Twitter (#GWCP306) Date accessed August 7,2014.

Halliwell, J. Joseph Boyden. The Agenda with Steve Paikin. Video. Joseph Boyden: First Nations and the First World War July 31, 2014. Author Joseph Boyden discusses the important role Aboriginals played in the First World War, and the real-life Ojibwe soldier that inspired his novel “Three Day Road.”2014. The Ontario Educational Communications Authority (TVO) Date accessed August 7,2014.

Harvey, Alban.
Joseph Boyden The Canadian Encyclopedia. Aboriginal Peoples. March 6, 2014. Date accessed August 7,2014.

Hayden, Michael. Why Are All Those Names on the Wall? The University of Saskatchewan and World War I. Saskatchewan History 58, no. 2 (2006): 4.14.

Higher Education. The University of Saskatchewan: The Start Saskatchewan News Index. Top News Stories. University of Saskatchewan Library. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Joseph Boyden. Wikipedia The free encyclopedia. March 7, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Lacey, Dana. Documents show Harper;s extreme political control The Canadian Journalism Project. June 8, 2010. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Long-lost names added to U of S War Memorial. 18 names will be added to the Roll of Honor. August 6, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Mattern, Ashleigh. Alumnus Profile: Brian Gable, editorial cartoonist for the Globe and Mail. Centennial Committee. April 16, 2012. The Sheaf, One Hundred Years.Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Nurse, Donna Bailey. Joseph Boyden Author Profile. Way of the Warrior. Joseph Boyden brings new voice to First World War epic. Quill and Quire, Canada’s magazine of Book News and Reviews. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Pitsula, James M. Manly Heroes: The University of Saskatchewan and the First World War. In Paul Stortz and E. Lisa Panayotidis, eds., Cultures, Communities, and Conflict: Histories of Canadian Universities and War. University of Toronto Press, 2012.

Preston, Richard. First World War centenary: how the events of August 1, 1914 unfolded. Telegraph. August 1, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014

Preston, Richard. First World War centenary: how the events of August 2, 1914 unfolded. Telegraph. August 2, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014

Preston, Richard. First World War centenary: how the events of August 3, 1914 unfolded. Telegraph. August 3, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014

Preston, Richard. First World War centenary: how the events of August 4, 1914 unfolded. Telegraph. August 4, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014

Remember Us Great War Commemoration project begins with plaque unveiling. Facebook.
Remember Us. University of Saskatchewan Great War Commemoration Project begins with plaque unveiling University of Saskatchewan News. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Sibbald, Kirk. Cartoons and Calculus. Green and White. FAll 2010. Features. University of Saskatchewan. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Stoon Great War on twitter (#StoonGreatWar) Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Story, Eric. Saskatchewan History online. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Streck, Aaron. Eighteen alumni names complete U of S commemoration from WWI Global News. Shaw Media Inc. August 7, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Tipalady, Thomas. The Soul of the Soldier Sketches from the Western Battle-Front Fleming H. Revell Company. New York. 1918. Project Gutenberg.org Ebook #46323 Produced by Al Haines. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

University remembers those who served in First World War. CTV news. August 7, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

University of Saskatchewan Great War on Twitter (#usaskGW) Date accessed August 7, 2014.

University of Saskatchewan honours students, faculty and staff who fought in WWI August 7, 2014. University of SAskatchewan News. August 7, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Three Day Road [This novel written by Joseph Boyden follows the journey of two young Cree men, Xavier and Elijah, who volunteer for that war and become snipers during World War I] Wikipedia the free encyclopedia. August 2, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Waiser, Bill. Opinion: Let’s protect future census data. Edmonton Journal Reprinted by the Ottawa Citizen. May 26, 2014. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

World War I Campus History. University of Saskatchewan. University Library. University Archives and Special Collections. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

  • Database at World War I:
  • Killed, died or wounded
  • U of S affiliation at enlistment
  • Batallion/unit at enlistment
  • Batallion/unit – all assignments
  • U of S College
  • Date of death
  • Decoration type
  • Rank

 

World War one Centenary on Twitter. (#wwicentenary) Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Stewart, Les. Why won’t this federal government support our invisibly wounded soldiers? Cartoon from the Globe and Mail, re posted by the Springwater Park Citizen’s Coalition, a sustainbale business plan for Springwater Provincial Park in Midhurst, Ontario. December 20, 2013. Date accessed August 7, 2014.

WWI Canada Centennial Commemoration on facebook Date accessed August 7, 2014.

Notice and Disclaimer:

The purpose of the information on this site is to assist genealogists, historians and other interested parties in locating information regarding the World War One Centenary Celebrations. Please e-mail the author at saskgenweb@yahoo.com if you have any further updates or additions. Thank you.

To cite this article:

World War One Remembered at the University of Saskatchewan . Saskatchewan Gen Web. Rootsweb. Ancestry.com . Retrieved .

E-mail saskgenweb@yahoo.com

 

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D-Day, June 6, 1944, 70th Anniversary Commemoration

27 May

D-Day, June 6, 1944, 70th Anniversary Commemoration
Are you ready for a trip to France?

Adapted from Library and Archives Canada images on Flickr. Set of images:D-Day

On June 6, 1944 – D-Day, the day of the Normandy Landings ~ Western Allied effort to liberate mainland Europe from Nazi occupation during World War II
Adapted from Library and Archives Canada images on Flickr. Set of images:D-Day

The Canadian Government has organised ceremonies in Canada and in France to honour those who served in World War II. This occasion commemorates the 70th anniversary of D-Day (June 6, 1944) and the Battle of Normandy.

Veterans from all nations and Canadians are all invited to attend the ceremonies. Provinces across the nation will additionally have ceremonies demarking the occasion. Financial assistance from Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) is available to help Veterans attend the overseas events in France.

Postcards for Peace is one method for youth to become involved in remembering the sacrifices made in times of war or in active service. Although Veteran’s Affairs suggests other ways to remember, such as inviting a Veteran or Canadian Armed Forces as a guest speaker to a classroom or to a community event, or to write stories and poems about remembrance for a few of the ideas they offer as ways to remember. Valentine’s for Vets encourages hand made valentines for our Canadian Veterans.

According to A Historical Atlas of Canada from Canada there were 22,817 army fatalities, 2,019 navy casualties and 17,101 casualties from the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) who had served in World War II. The Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial lists 4,952 who paid the supreme sacrifice from Saskatchewan or 11.8% of the World War II Canadian contingent.

The 1952-53 Canada Year Book reports that Saskatchewan as a province had a population of 895,992 in 1941 and 831,728 in 1951, whereas the nation of Canada had a total population of 11,596,655 in 1941 and 14,009,429 in 1951. Saskatchewan represented 7.7% of the Canadian population in 1941, and 5.9% of the population in 1951.

The strategy and planning that went into D-day and the landings in Normandy resulted in the vitally strategic capture of Caen on July 9. According to the CBC, “For Canada, 14,000 soldiers were to land on the beaches; another 450 were to drop behind enemy lines by parachute or glider. The Royal Canadian Navy supplied ships and about 10,000 sailors.” Counting the casualties from the D-Day invasion from all allied forces has been estimated at 10,000 dead and wounded. Veterans Affairs reports that about three hundred and forty Canadians were killed on D-Day on Juno Beach alone. Over 5,000 paid the supreme sacrifice.

Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial presents a Roll of Honour for those from Saskatchewan who paid the ultimate sacrifice during World War II.


“Lest We Forget

 

They shall gow not old, as we that are left grow old, age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, we will remember them.

We will remember them

Lord God of Hosts

Be with us yet,

Lest we forget,

Lest we forget.”

Author Julia Adamson

For more information:

1952-53 Canada Year Book Statistics Canada. 2009-06-09. Date accessed May 26, 2014.

Adamson, Julia Saskatchewan Gen Web – Military Resources. Date Accessed May 26, 2014.

Barry, Bill. Saskatchewan Virtual War Memorial Date accessed May 26, 2014.
Canada and the Second World War. Canada at D-Day. Canadian War Museum. Canadian Museum of History. Government of Canada. Date accessed May 26, 2014.

CBC D-day The Allied Invasion of Normandy. june 4, 2009.

Kerr, D.G.G., editor. Historical Atlas of Canada. Canadian Historical Associations Committee on a Historical Atlas of Canada. 1960. Thomas Nelson and Sons (Canada) ltd. Library of Congress catalog card number 60-9189.

Library and Archives Canada images on Flickr. Set of images: D-Day

Veterans Affairs Canada >> Remembrance >>
History >>
The Second World War >>
D-Day and the Battle of Normandy

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Montgomery Place Est. in 1946 by our War Veterans

9 Oct

Montgomery Place.

Est. in 1946 by Our War Veterans.

 


General Bernard L. Montgomery watches his tanks move up. North Africa, November 1942
General Bernard L. Montgomery
Photographer: Keating G (Capt) Imperial War Museums public domain photograph E 18980.

Canadian Forces veterans built their homes in the Saskatoon neighborhood community of Montgomery Place during the years 1946-77. Montgomery Place was established with small agricultural land holdings outside the city of Saskatoon under the Federal Government’s Veteran’s Land Act (VLA) for men and women returning from World War II (1 September 1939 – 2 September 1945) and the Korean War (25 June 1950 – 27 July 1953).

According the Library and Archives Canada, the “British and French Governments encouraged former soldiers to settle in Canada.” More than 140,000 veterans applied for grants and loans under the Veteran’s Land Act 1942. The Soldier Settlement Act of 1917 “to those who framed the Veteran’s Land Act of World War II, which avoided many of the problems inherent in the 1919 legislation.”Soldier Settlement

The 1942 Veteran’s Land Act was put forward to assist thousands of returning soldiers needing accommodation following the war. Grants and loans were made available to veterans wishing to construct their own home. Initially, qualified veterans could receive a maximum of $4,800, “of which $3,600 is the maximum for land and buildings and $1,200 is the maximum for chattels. But the maximum indebtedness the veteran assumes is $2,400.” A veteran wishing to be settled on a small holding near a village, town or city, in order to secure employment, an apply for assistance to build a home on the small acreage. Veterans could apply for a loan to be put toward fencing, a well, sundry tools, small implements, household equipment. 10 per cent of the land cost is due the Directory, and 2/3 of the land and improvement cost needs to be repaid over the next 25 years at an interest rate of three and a half percent.


In life, each of us falls a serious chance, some do not realize the full significance of the moment and miss him. Others, focused and dedicated, grab the opportunity with both hands and use it to the full, and the good people always show scruples in the choice of means to achieve their goals, they do not come on the head those who stand in their way.
~Field marshal Sir Bernard Law Montgomery

Generally “Land Settlement” refers to settlement on the land for full-time farming operating a wheat farm, mixed farm or dairy. The Veteran’s Land Act of 1942 aimed to provide for those veterans who had no experience nor background to undertake an agricultural operation. Assistance was offered with the aim that a “small holding settlement or part-time farming coupled with industrial, commercial, or other employment from which it is expected the main income will be derived. In this way, veterans established in a small holding settlement close to employment opportunities they could follow the trade or profession of their expertise and not feel obligated to start out in a full-time agricultural operation where they have no skill or experience.

In this way veterans held enough land in a small holding to “erect a home, landscape, and work to his own advantage…the majority of small holders are carrying on year by year with a planned property improvement. Each year further use and pleasure is being derived from the opportunities afforded by these generous-sized properties. There is family enjoyment from ample play yards, game areas, and flower gardens and pleasure to be derived from planting your own trees, shrubs, and flowers. Savings can be realized from the well planned home garden, and in many cases substantial incomes are being derived from special crops such as bush fruits, and perennial vegetables. Many of the small holdings home owners realized sufficient income to meet their taxes, or other expenses through vegetable or fruit crops grown on their property.”S-P 08-25-52 I.L. Holmes, acting district superintendent for the V.L.A. in Saskatoon said, “the over-all picture would lead to a lowering of general overhead costs.”S-P 08-25-52

By October 31, 1945, over 500,000 acres had been purchased across Canada by the Veterans Land Act Administration, of which 20,424 acres were purchased as small holdings at a cost of $4,306,280, and of these 12,392 were already in use. By the end of 1945, it was expected that 80 VLA homes would be completed in Saskatchewan, of which 25 were in the Saskatoon area. The following year, 1946, six houses were to be readied for occupancy.

 


“The morale of the soldier is the greatest single factor in war.”

~Field marshal Sir Bernard Law Montgomery

The Veteran’s Lands Act aimed at settling the veteran’s as part-time farmers or small agricultural holders who could supplement their income with chickens, vegetable growing, fruit trees, and gardens on their half acre lots. (Property lots in the Montgomery Place neighbourhood have frontages of 30-meters (100 feet). Several lots are close to half an acre. This compares to other neighbourhoods in Saskatoon, where property lots average 7.5 meters (25 feet) frontages in inner city areas, and 15-meters (50 feet) in other areas of the city. )

In 1963, Montgomery Place was expanded, and an additional 78 small land holdings of half an acre each were added. Under the revised VLA arrangements, “if title was secured and the plan approved, a war veteran making application for assistance to establish a small holding could receive a maximum of $12,000SP 5-19-62 in the form of a loan with which to erect a home. The maximum loan amounts were increased regularly to ease financial burdens upon the veterans due to inflation. The VLA arrangement came to an end in 1971, and non-veterans have also made residence in the Montgomery Place community. Over the course of the VLA operation over 125,000 veterans settled successfully.

Discussions to amalgamate the community of Montgomery Place with the city of Saskatoon began in 1954, and the neighborhood incorporated within the city January 1, 1955. A special property tax agreement was enacted protecting the veteran residents. This tax agreement expired in 1979, and full city property taxes were assessed. However, by this year, 50 of the landowners had subdivided parcels of land into smaller lots and sold them.

The Veterans Land Act was a program offering servicemen a welcome back home and an opportunity to re-establish themselves into civilian life. The Government supported this period of adjustment and desired to “put the veteran in as good or a better position than he enjoyed if he had not enlisted.”S-P 7-17-45

Located southwest of the 11th Street and Dundonald Avenue intersection in Saskatoon, the neighborhood of Montgomery Place streets and roadways memorialize the war effort; Caen Street, Arnhem Street, Normandy Street, Ortona Street, Merritt Street, Dieppe Street, Mountbatten Street, Currie Avenue, McNaughton Avenue, Rockingham Avenue, Haida Avenue, Simonds Avenue, Cassino Avenue & Place, Crerar Drive, Crescent Boulevard, Lancaster Boulevard & Crescent, Bader Crescent.

Arnhem Street Battle of Arnhem
Bader Crescent Group Captain Sir Douglas Robert Steuart Bader ( February 21, 1910 – September 5, 1982) Royal Air Force (RAF) fighter ace
Caen Street Battle for Caen
Cassino Avenue and Place Battle of Monte Cassino
Crerar Drive, Crescent, Boulevard General Henry Duncan Graham “Harry” Crerar (April 28, 1888 – April 1, 1965)
Currie Avenue “Major David Vivian Currie, (8 July 1912 July 8, 1912)
Sutherland, Saskatchewan – 20 June 1986)”
Dieppe Street Battle of Dieppe
Gougeon Park
Haida Avenue HMCS – HAIDA
Lancaster Boulevard and Crescent Avro Lancaster Bomber
Lt. Col. Drayton Walker Park Lt. Colonel Drayton Walker (1900-1975)
McNaughton Avenue General Andrew George Latta McNaughton,( February 25, 1887 – July 11, 1966)
Merritt Street Lt. Colonel Charles Cecil Ingersoll Merritt ( November 10, 1908 – July 12, 2000)
Montgomery Place and Montgomery Park Field Marshal B.L. Montgomery ( November 17, 1887 – March 24, 1976)
Mountbatten Street Admiral of the Fleet Louis Francis Albert Victor Nicholas Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma, (born Prince Louis of Battenberg; ( June 25, 1900 – August 27, 1979)
Normandy Street D -Day, the Normandy Invasion
Ortona Street Battle of Ortona
Rockingham Avenue Brigadier General John Meredith Rockingham ( August 24, 1911 -1988)
Simonds Avenue and Lt. Gen. G.G. Simonds Park Lieutenant-General Guy G. Simonds (April 23rd, 1903 – May 15th, 1974.)


Field Marshall B.L. Montgomery 1887-1976

Field Marshall B.L. Montgomery (1887-1976)
Photographer Julia Adamson

The neighborhood of Montgomery Place, Montgomery Park and Montgomery School all take their name from Field Marshal B.L. Montgomery (1887-1976). According to a plaque erected within the neighborhood, “Montgomery was one of the most inspirational British military leaders of the Second World War. After significant victories over German General Erwin Rommel in North Africa (1942-1944), he was promoted to Field Marshal in command of British and Canadian troops. Montgomery presided over the Battles of Arnhem and Normandy and accepted the formal surrender of the German military at Luneburg Heath on May 4, 1945. His flair for command and the absolute belief in his infallibility made him a legendary, if not always popular, leader.” The BBC reports that Winston Churchill felt that his victory at the Battle of El Alamein was the turning point in the Second World War.

 


I have always maintained that the army – not just a certain amount in one place people with such a number of tanks, guns, machine guns, etc., and that the strength of the army – not just the sum of its parts. The real strength of the army is and must be much more than this amount. Extending the power it gives morale, morale, mutual confidence in each other commanders and subordinates (in particular this applies to the high command), a sense of camaraderie, and many other subtle spiritual factors.

Raw materials, which have to deal with the general – the people. The same is true for civilian life. I think the managers of large industrial concerns are not always aware of this report, it seems that the raw materials – is iron ore, cotton and rubber – not people, and goods. In talking with them, I would not agree with this, and claimed that their main raw material – the people. Many generals also misunderstand this important moment, not aware of what is behind them, and this is one of the reasons that some of them were not successful.

In battle, the army should be as strong as steel, and make it possible, but just as she began to acquire its best quality only after a lot of preparation, and provided that its composition properly selected and processed. Unlike steel army – very delicate instrument, which is very easy to damage, its main component – the people, and to have a good command the army, you need to understand human nature. In humans lies a huge emotional energy, it breaks out, and need to use it for the intended purpose and to give out so that warms the heart and stirs the imagination. If the commander is to the human factor is cold and impersonal, it has not achieved anything. But if you manage to win the trust and loyalty of your soldiers, if they feel that you care about their interests and security, then you become the owner of priceless assets, and the greatest achievements are you on the shoulder.

The morale of the soldiers – the most important factor in the war, and victory in battle – the best way to strengthen their morale during the war. Good general who wins the battle with minimal losses, but maintaining a high morale and a great loss if the battle is won and the soldiers know that the victims brought knowingly and that took care of the wounded, and the bodies of the fallen gathered and interred with dignity.

Some people think that the morale of the English soldier is highest, if you provide it with all necessary allowances, surrounding clubs, canteens, etc. I do not agree. My personal experience is that they are all determined to win when they are asked to stay in the most severe conditions.”
~
Bernard Law Montgomery Memoirs

Lt Colonel David Vivian Currie

Lt Colonel David Vivian Currie
Library and Archives Canada MIKAN ID number 4233303 public domain image.

Lt. Colonel David Vivian Currie (1913-1986) is honoured by the naming of Currie Avenue. “Lt. Colonel David Currie is the only Saskatchewan born holder of the Victoria Cross. Born in Sutherland and raised in Moose Jaw, Currie joined the 29th Canadian Armoured Reconnaissance Regiment in 1939. An
unflappable and, apparently, unstoppable individual” Currie and his troops defended St. Lambert in the battle of Falaise Gap in August, 1944. Down to 60 men and 12 tanks, Major Currie held the town against repeated German counter-attacks for 36 hours. In 1966 he became Sergeant at Arms of the House of Commons” reports the memorial erected in his honour.

General Andrew George Latta McNaughton, February 25, 1887 –  July 11, 1966

General Andrew McNaughton

Library and Archives Canada public domain image MIKAN ID number 4232580

General Andrew McNaughton was memorialized in the title of McNaughton Avenue. “General Andrew McNaughton first attained prominence in the First World War as a Brigadier General in command of the Canadian artillery at the age of 31. By the Second World War he was head of the National Research Council, but returned to the army as commander of the First Canadian Division. He was instrumental in keeping Canadian troops together as one army, rather than distributed amongst British units. He later served as Minister of Defense and as a delegate to the United Nations.”

Lieutenant General Guy C. Simonds (1903-1974)
Lieutenant General Guy C. Simonds (1903-1974)

Library and Archives Canada public domain image MIKAN ID number 4232760

Simonds Avenue identifies the achievements of Lieutenant General Guy C. Simonds (1903-1974). “Lieutenant General Guy C. Simonds commanded the 1st Canadian Infantry Division in the Sicilian and Italian campaigns. He then led the Canadian Corps through the Normandy Invasion and the taking of the Islands in the Scheldt Estuary covering the approaches to Antwerp, Belgium. Lieutenant General Simonds subsequently became Chief of the General Staff from 1951-1955.”


Brigadier General John Meredith Rockingham 1911-1988

Brigadier General John Meredith Rockingham (1911-1988)

Julia Adamson photographer

Rockingham Avenue extols Brigadier General John Meredith Rockingham (1911-1988). Montgomery Place community residents remember Rockingham thusly; ” Brigadier General John Rockingham commanded the 9th Canadian Infantry Brigade in the campaign in northwest Europe during the last year of World War II. “Rocky”, as he was affectionately known, would be recalled to service in 1950 as the senior Canadian soldier in the Korean war. His masterful tactics, and his determination that the Canadian Army would not shirk its assigned duties, were instrumental in Canada’ contributions in Korea.”

Montgomery Place, Saskatoon Monument

Montgomery Place Monument, Saskatoon
Photographer Julia Adamson

Merritt Street remembers and pays tribute to Lt. Colonel Cecil Merritt, who is eulogized as “Lt. Colonel Cecil Merritt (1908-1991) Lt. Col. Cecil Merritt won the first Victoria Cross given to a Canadian in WWII for gallantry and inspired leadership during the disastrous raid in Dieppe. He landed with the South Saskatchewan Regiment at Pourville on August 19, 1942. To capture important high ground to the east, they had to cross the Scie by a bridge under heavy fire. Seeing the situations, Merritt walked on to the bridge, waved his helmet to encourage his men, and shouted: “Come on over, there’s nothing to worry about here.” After hours of heavy fighting, Merritt and his men were taken captive. Merritt was commended for his leadership while a prisoner.”


“Don’t listen to anyone who tells you that you can’t do this or that. That’s nonsense. Make up your mind, you’ll never use crutches or a stick, then have a go at everything. Go to school, join in all the games you can. Go anywhere you want to. But never, never let them persuade you that things are too difficult or impossible.”~Group Captain Sir Douglas Bader

Group Captain Sir Douglas Robert Steuart Bader

Group Captain Sir Douglas Robert Steuart Bader.

UK Royal Air Force Museum public domain image

Group Captain Sir Douglas Bader (1910-1982) was honoured similarly with a plaque which reads, “A hero of the Battle of Britain whose name came to define triumph over adversity. Bader joined the RAF at 20, and lost both legs in a crash in 1931. Discharged in 1933, he pestered the RAF until re-instated in 1935. His disability proved an advantage in dogfights, as he was immune to blackouts caused by blood rushing to a pilot’s legs during tight turns. Bader devised innovative battle formations which led to 22 kills before he was shot down. Captured in France, he would make many escape attempts, forcing the Germans to take away his artificial legs each night. Bader was knighted for his work on behalf of the disabled.”


” “Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the obedience of fools.”~Group Captain Sir Douglas Bader

First Canadian Army generals in the Netherlands, on May 20 1945. Sitting, from left to right: Stanislaw Maczek, 1st Polish Armoured Division; Guy Simonds, II Canadian Corps; H.D.G. Crerar, 1st Canadian Army; Charles Foulkes, I Canadian Corps; B.M. Hoffmeister, 5th Armoured Division. Standing, from left to right: R.H. Keefler, 3rd Infantry Division; A.B. Matthews, 2nd Infantry Division; H.W. Foster, 1st Infantry Division; R.W. Moncel, 4th Armoured Brigade; S.B. Rawlins, 49th British Division.
Seated center H.D.G. Crerar, 1st Canadian Army (First Canadian Army generals group picture)
Photographer Ken Bell Department of National Defence / National Archives of Canada, public domain image number PA-137473.

Crerar Drive, Crescent Boulevard acknowledges the impact on the war effort by Lt. General Harry D. Crerar (1888-1965). Montgomery Place residents recalls, that “as the Canadian Chief of Staff, Crerar wanted a distinctly Canadian corps, bringing together armoured and infantry divisions in a unified fighting force. In the past, Canadian regiments had been apportioned out to British armies, depending on the needs of the moment. Crerar created the First Canadian Corps. It consisted of the 1st Canadian Infantry Division, 5th Canadian Armoured Divisions, 1st Canadian Armoured Brigade and supporting units. After D-Day, Canadian troops led by Gen. Crerar distinguished themselves fighting against some of Hitler’s crack divisions.”

Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma
Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma

Public domain image from the U.S. Federal Government National Park Service employee.

Mountbatten Street shows respect for “Admiral Lord Louis Mountbatten (1900-1979). A British Royal, Lord Louis Mountbatten, Supreme Allied Commander, South East Asia, received the surrender of 680,879 officers and men of the Imperial Japanese Forces. He also supervised the ill-fated raid on Dieppe where almost 70% of the fighting force was killed, wounded or captured. With the American joining the war, he and Gen. George C. Marshall created the first integrated Allied headquarters in 1942. Lord Mountbatten was assassinated in 1979 by the provisional wing of the Irish Republican Army, who had planted a bomb on his pleasure boat.”


Montgomery Place Monument

Montgomery Place Monument

Photographer Julia Adamson

Lt. Col. Drayton Walker Park honours “Lt. Colonel Drayton E. Walker (1900-1975) born in Maple Creek, Saskatchewan, Drayton Ernest Walker achieved prominence as both a veteran and an educator. He left a teaching career to serve with the Saskatoon Light Infantry in 1939, fighting in the invasion of Sicily. He became commanding officer achieving the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. Injured in 1943, he received the Distinguished Service Order. Walker returned to Saskatoon where he became Principal of Bedford Road Collegiate and later the first Principal of Mount Royal Collegiate. He retired in 1966 after a 3 year term as Principal of the Armed Services School in Marville, France.”

Dieppe
Dieppe
Public Domain Image by Elodie Marnot
Dieppe Street received its title paying homage to Dieppe, “a French resort town, Dieppe was the site of a Canadian – British amphibious raid on August 19, 1942. The plan was to destroy several German installations and leave immediately. The timing depended strictly on sunrise with troops having to retreat before the high tide. It failed. Of 5,000 Canadian troops to land 900 were killed and 1,300 were taken prisoner. Many lessons were learned from this ill-fated attack, including the importance of prior air bombings and support of assault troops with artillery fire. These valuable tactics were implemented in subsequent raids, contributing to the success at Normandy two years later.”


Sign monument Montgomery Place

Montgomery Place Monument
Julia Adamson Photographer

Arnhem Street received its appellation to give tribute to The Battle of Arnhem. “On Sept. 17, 1944 the Battle of Arnhem, in Holland, was the last and most crucial phase of Operation Market Garden. It was the biggest airborne military operation ever mounted and was designed to bring the war in Europe to a quick end. The plan was to take control of 8 bridges along the German-Dutch border. British troops were deliberately dropped 8 miles from the bridges. It was impossible for them to reach their target before the Germans knew of the attack. Nearly 6,000 from the 1st Airborne Division were captured and 1,174 killed. Almost 1,900 men escaped. The battle was immortalized in the book and movie A Bridge Too Far.”


Canadian Armour Passing Through Ortona, by Dr. Charles Fraser Comfort.

Ortona


Dr. Charles Fraser Comfort public domain image CN 12245 Canadian War Museum.

Similarly another sign honours the Battle of Ortona, the namesake for Ortona Street. “The Loyal Edmonton Regiment fought at the Battle of Ortona during World War II. Canadian troops met German troops at the Moro River just outside the Italian town of Ortona, and fought their way into town during eight bloody days in December, 1943. 1,375 Canadian troops lost their lives securing the town. The Allies also used this seaport battle as a diversion to delay and prevent Hitler from sending troops up to France or on to Rome, where the survivors of the brutal battle eventually wound up.”


Battle Of Ortona memorial

Battle of Ortona
Julia Adamson photographer


H Captain Callum Thompson, a Canadian chaplain, conducting a funeral service in the Normandy bridgehead, France, 16 July 1944.

Normandy
Library and Archives Canada public domain image reference number PA-190111 and under the MIKAN ID number 3520665

Normandy Street received its designation recalling D-Day and the Battle of Normandy. “On June 6, 1944, Allied troops stormed the beaches of Normandy in France. Canadian sea and airmen were among the first into action. Their high casualty rate reflected the specific tasks of the Canadian Army during the campaign and the fact that it continually faced the best troops the enemy had to offer. D-Day and the Battle of Normandy, which led to the end of WWII, was one of Canada’s most significant military engagements. The armies of the Nazi regime had suffered a resounding defeat. In the process, Canada’s troops had been forged into a highly effective army.”


Sign monument dedicated to Caen Street in Montgomery Place

Caen
Julia Adamson Photographer

A plaque within the community commemorates Caen Street, “Caen, a town in the Normandy region of France, was captured by Canadian and British troops following D-Day in 1944. After two days of vicious battle, during which company casualties frequently reached 25%, the Allies clawed their way in and declared Caen their own. The Germans still occupied much of the surrounding area including the airfield to the west and the high ground ridge to the south. Much Canadian blood would be shed during the following weeks in order to finally seize these key positions.”

Monte Cassino

Monte Cassino
Public Domain Images from the Army Quartermaster Museum Collection at MOUT Image Collection

The Battle of Cassino is memorialized in the naming of Cassino Avenue and Cassino Place. The plaque reads “The town of Cassino, Italy and the nearby Benedictine Abbey of Monte Cassino were the scene of one of WWII’s most fierce battles. Monte Cassino overlooked the road the Allies needed to travel to reach Rome. German artillery placed around the Abbey prevented any use of the road by Allied troops. Finally, after five months of repeated attempts to dislodge the Germans by ground assaults, air strikes and one of the largest artillery barrages in history, a combined force of Polish and Canadian troops succeeded in taking the Abbey. Monte Cassino Abbey was reduced to rubble, but has been largely rebuilt.”

Avro Lancaster PA474

Avro Lancaster PA474

Public domain image from the photographer Adrian Pingstone

Lancaster Boulevard & Crescent pay tribute to the Lancaster Bomber. Montgomery Place honours this plane thusly; “The Lancaster Bomber was built by the A.V.Roe Company during World War II. It was a favourite with bomber crews due to its strong reliable performance and was said to be “a delight to fly.” Along with the Halifax Bomber, it was the mainstay of the RCAF. Some 7,378 planes were manufactured, with 403 being built in Canada. During the war it flew 156,023 sorties and dropped 608,612 UK tons of bombs, more than all the rest of the British bombers combined. Its service life extended far beyond World War II, with many converted for peacetime use.”

HMCS Haida

HMCS Haida (G63)

Public domain image from the photographer (Rick Cordeiro)

The reputation of HMCS Haida is observed in the title given to Haida Avenue. “The destroyer HMCS Haida served Canada during the Second World War. Named after the native people of the Queen Charlotte Islands in BC, she escorted merchant ships to Russia on the Murmansk run and was on the scene when the Scharnhorst was sunk. In a little more than four months in the English Channel the convoy of ships she serviced in, sank or helped destroy two large torpedo boats, two destroyers, a U-boat, trawler, minesweeper, cargo ship and patrol boat. HMCS Haida is proudly displayed in Toronto.”


“Every soldier must know, before he goes into battle, how the little battle he is to fight fits into the larger picture, and how the success of his fighting will influence the battle as a whole.”
~
Bernard Law Montgomery

Article Written by Julia Adamson

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Although my team doctrine requires sufficiently detailed explanation, in principle they can be reduced to one word: leadership.

In his memoirs, Truman said that of course he got the following stories: “The leader – a person who has the ability to make other people do what they do not want, and still experience the pleasure.”

Leadership may be too complex a phenomenon to fit it in such a short definition. On the other hand, the word is often used somewhat loosely, not realizing its full value. I give a definition of leadership: “The capacity and the will to rally men and women to achieve a common goal, and personality, able to summon the confidence.”

This ability alone is small, the leader must have the desire and the will to use it. This means that his leadership is based on truth and the peculiarities of his personality: the leader can not lie about the purpose and needs to have a strong character.

Not everyone understands the need for truth. Leader has to speak the truth to his subordinates. If he does not, they soon find out that he lied to them, and no longer trust him. I have not always told the soldiers in the war the whole truth. This is not was necessary, moreover, it would place at risk kept secret.

I told them all they needed to know to successfully complete their task. But I always told them the truth, and they knew it. Thus was worked out and strengthened mutual trust. Good military leader subdues the tide. It should just let things be strong for him, and he immediately ceases to be a leader.
When all is said and done, the leader should actively influence the course of events, which largely depends on his personality – from the “heat” that it can emit, the flame that burns in him, magnetism that attracts the hearts of those around him . Personally, I would like to know about the leader of the following:

Where is he going?

Whether he will go to the end?

Does he have this ability and the necessary data, including the knowledge, experience, and courage?
Will he make decisions, taking full responsibility, whether ready if necessary to take the risk?

Will it be in this case, to share power and go whether to decentralize command and control, after having built the system of organization with the specific decision-making centers, providing fast and effective implementation?

Crucial role played by the problem of “solving” the plan. The current trend – to avoid making a decision, to play for time in the hope that all by itself. A military leader has no other option but to be decisive in the battle and show calm in critical situations. Well guided by these principles and political leader.

I am of the opinion that a leader must know what he wants. It must clearly define their target, and then focus on its achievement, it should bring to everyone what he wants and that is the basis of his strategy. He should provide strong leadership and give clear guidance. It is required to create what I call the “atmosphere”, and in this atmosphere will live and work his subordinate commanders.”~
Bernard Law Montgomery Memoirs

 

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